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7 Easy Hikes With Spectacular Views In Tromso, Norway

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Tromso (or Tromsø which is its real name), is a relatively small city in Northern Norway, north of the Arctic Circle where I grew up. Covered by mountains and wilderness, Tromso is the perfect place for outdoor activities like hiking! The mountains surrounding Tromso are for many people the main reason for living in this Arctic city, as mountain hiking and skiing are very popular the whole year-round.

If you are thinking of heading to Tromso, then you should also check out our Tromso guide with tips on what to see, do and eat.

Tromso has a lot of accommodation options to choose from. If you haven’t yet decided on a place to stay, read our complete guide on where to stay in Tromso.

Being out in the nature of Tromso, hiking, kayaking, dog sledding, or Northern Lights watching, can be a cold experience if you don`t wear the right clothes and shoes. Here is a complete packing list of what to bring to Tromso for a summer or winter trip.

In recent years hiking in the mountains has become increasingly popular among visiting tourists as well, and we often meet tourists on our hikes. For many of them, this is their first time exploring the mountains. Since I was a little girl, these mountains have been my playground, and I’d like to highlight some of my favorite mountains for beginner hikers.

These are the best easy hikes in Tromso that provide breathtaking views (in my opinion) :

1. Brosmetinden (525 m)

Brosmetinden is one of my favorite walks. It is an easy hike where you have a fantastic view of the ocean and neighboring islands the whole hike. The view from the top the view is breathtaking!

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Maria enjoying the view at Borsmetinden

You can see the top of Borsmetinden mountain from the parking place. There is a well-marked pathway all the way up to the top, so it`s easy to find the way.

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Walking path to Brosmetinden
  • Where is it: Brosmetinden is on the “backside” of Kvaløya island, next to Rekvik and Tromvik.
  • Height: 525 meters above sea level
  • Distance to walk: 4 km both ways
  • Time: 1-2 hours (round-trip)
  • How to get there by car: It is easiest to get to Brosmetinden by car (1 hour). It takes one hour from Tromsø center by car to get to the starting point of the hike to Brosmetinden. From Tromsø you drive to Kvaløya, follow the signs to Eidkjosen. At Eidkjosen you take to the right at the intersection and drive to Kaldfjorden and over to Grøtfjorden. There is a stunning beach in Grøtfjorden, well worth a stop. Grøtfjord is the perfect place to go for a swim, play some beach volleyball and have a barbeque on the beach. From Grøtfjorden you follow the signs towards Tromvik. At the intersection, take the left towards Rekvik. The parking, which is free, is on the right-hand side of the road, and the path towards Brosmetinden starts just next to the parking.
  • How to get there by bus: Take the district bus no. 425 to Tromvik or Rekvik, and walk from there to the starting point of the hiking path to Brosmetinden. Tell the driver that you want to hike Brosmetinden and he will let you off at the right place.
    Bus no. 425 departs from Prostneset, the main bus station in Tromsø city center located beside the Tromsø Tourist Information Office. You can purchase tickets onboard the bus, but cash payments only, or you can buy a ticket through the app “Troms Mobillett”. You can check the bus schedule HERE (search the Travel Planner from “Tromsø Prostneset” to “Rekvikvegen (Tromsø)” or through the app “Troms Reise”.
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Midnight sun over Grøtfjord. It is well worth a stop on the way to Brosmetind.

2. Fløya (671 m)

A trip to the mountain Fløya is mandatory when visiting Tromso. You can take the easy way out and opt for the cable car (4 minutes each way), but if you want some exercise and a great hike, you should grab your running shoes and walk up to the top.

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View of Tromso city from Fløya

From the cable car house, you can take the path to the right, there is a sign showing where to go.

Another option is to walk up the new and very cool and impressive “Sherpa Staircase” which is located to the left of the cable car. The stairs start in Fløyvegen. This is steeper than the path to the right of the cable car, but the stone stairs help. 🙂

On your way up, you get a better and better view of Tromsø city and in the distance, the island Kvaløya, with its beautiful mountains. The view is absolutely breathtaking once you get to the top, and it is the perfect place to enjoy the midnight sun during summer or the northern lights during winter.

Treat yourself to a well-deserved beer, coffee, tea or soda at the cafe/restaurant at the top, accompanied with a Norwegian waffle while you admire the famous Tromso view.

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Walking path to Fløya (click the map for a bigger version)
  • Where is it: Fløya is located on the mainland, Tromsdalen, which is connected by a bridge from Tromsø.
  • Height: 671 meters above sea level
  • Distance to walk: 7 km both ways (you can take the cable car down)
  • Time: 2-3 hours (if you walk up and down, less if you take the cable car down)
  • How to get there: From Tromsø center, you can drive a car over to the cable car in Tromsdalen (10 min). There is a big parking place at the bottom of the cable car, where you will have to pay for parking.
    You can also walk over the bridge to Tromsdalen (30 min, 2,5 km), which is a beautiful and easy walk where you pass the famous Arctic Cathedral.
    Another alternative is to take bus no. 26 from the city center. You can purchase tickets onboard the bus, but cash payments only, or you can buy a ticket through the app “Troms Mobillett”. You can check the bus schedule HERE (search the Travel Planner from “Sjøgata S1 (Tromsø)” to “Fjellheisen (Tromsø)” or through the app “Troms Reise”.

3. Rødtind (470 m)

Rødtind is “my mountain”. I grew up right next to this mountain, so this area has been my backyard playground ever since I was a little girl.

Rødtind is where I learned to Telemark Ski, and this is where we went on family hikes during the weekends. I simply love this mountain! ♥

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Rødtind is also great during winter like here in January during the period when the sun never rises above the horizon

It is a fairly easy hike, but you will feel your pulse rise as it is uphill all the way. You start by the Ski stadium “Storelva Skistadion”, where there is a big parking place, and follow the gravel road beside the river. Just before the road goes over the river (on a small bridge), after about 1 km, you turn left through the forest. There is a well-marked and easy-to-follow-path.

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Maria and Lara at the top of Rødtind

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Walking path to Rødtind (click on the map to see the full version)
  • Where is it: Rødtind is located on Kvaløya, at a place called Storelva.
  • Height: 470 meters above sea level
  • Distance to walk: 4 km both ways
  • Time: 1-2 hours (round-trip)
  • How to get there: From Tromsø, you can get to Storelva by car (15 min). There is a big parking place at Storelva stadium (behind the school Kvaløya vgs).
    You can also take bus no. 42 to Eidkjosen and get off at “Storelv Snuplass”. You can purchase tickets onboard the bus, but cash payments only, or you can buy a ticket through the app “Troms Mobillett”. You can check the bus schedule HERE (search the Travel Planner from “Sjøgata S4 (Tromsø)” to “Storelv snuplass (Tromsø)” or through the app “Troms Reise”.

4. Nattmålsfjellet (297 m)

Nattmålsfjellet is another small mountain on the island Kvaløya which is easy to hike and with a great view over Ersfjord.

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Maria and Varga at the top of Nattmålsfjellet

You can access this mountain from two sides; from the Ersfjord side (then it is called “Klokka ti”), or from Kattfjordeidet where it is called Nattmålsfjellet. It is easiest to hike to this mountain from the Kattfjordeidet side, as it is not so steep.

Even though Nattmålsfjellet is a small mountain the views are big! From the top, you get a very nice view of the fjords Ersfjord and Kaldfjord.

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Varga and Maria at Nattmålsfjellet

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Walking path to Nattmålsfjellet
  • Where is it: Nattmålsfjellet is on the island Kvaløya, at a mountain area called Kattfjordeidet which has the nickname “Scandinavian Chamonix” due to its many great mountains.
  • Height: 297 meters above sea level
  • Distance to walk: 4 km both ways
  • Time: 1 hour (round-trip)
  • How to get there: You can get here by car (30 min), this is easiest. Drive to Kattfjordeidet on Kvaløya (towards Kattfjord/ Sommarøya), there is a free parking place on the left side of the road. The walking path is however on the right side of the road. The path is well marked and easy to follow. This is not a steep mountain at all when you enter it from the Kattfjordeidet side.
    You can also take the bus no. 425 to Kattfjord, and walk from there to the start of the hiking path to Nattmålstinden. You can purchase tickets onboard the bus, but cash payments only, or you can buy a ticket through the app “Troms Mobillett”. You can check the bus schedule HERE (in the Travel Planner, search from “Tromsø Prostneset (Tromsø)” to “Kattfjordeidet (Tromsø)” or through the app “Troms Reise”. Or you can take the bus no. 425 to Ersfjord and hike the mountain from the other side (search from “Tromsø Prostneset (Tromsø)” to “Ersfjordbotn skole (Tromsø)”.

5. Ørnfløya (150 m)

Ørnfløya is more like a hill than a mountain. It is not steep at all and is an easy hike that can easily be combined with no. 6 Hillesøytoppen (below). From the top, you get an amazing view over the small fishing village Sommarøy and Hillesøy, as well as the lovely island Senja and the small characteristic Håja.

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Spectacular views over the Summer Island and Senja Island from Ørnfløya mountain

If the weather is good, you can walk down to the sea for a swim in the arctic ocean.

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Walking path to Ørnfløya
  • Where is it: Ørnfløya is located on the “outside” of Kvaløya, on Brensholmen, just before you get to Sommarøy.
  • Height: 150 meters above sea level
  • Distance to walk: 2 km both ways
  • Time: 1 hour (round-trip)
  • How to get there: It is easiest to get to Ørnfløya by car (1 hour). From Tromsø, drive to Kvaløya, and follow the signs towards Sommarøy. When you get to the last intersection leading to Sommarøy, turn left (instead of right to Sommarøy) towards Brennsholmen. The free parking place is just after this intersection (100 m from the intersection).
    You can also take bus no. 420 or 422 to Brensholmen. You can purchase tickets onboard the bus, but cash payments only, or you can buy a ticket through the app “Troms Mobillett”. You can check the bus schedule HERE (search from “Tromsø Prostneset” to “Brensholmen (Tromsø)” or through the app “Troms Reise”.

6. Hillesøytoppen (211 m)

This is a small mountain, more like a hill, beautifully located out in the sea outside of Tromsø. You start walking from the youth center on Hillesøy. The walk up is quite steep, but nothing scary, and there is a well-marked path to follow.

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Håja in midnight sun from the top of Hillesøytoppen

You can take another path on the way down, which is less steep and has a breathtaking view over small bays with white beaches and turquoise water. Turn to the left once you get to the top to follow this other path, it goes straight down to the ocean where you turn left again and head towards the houses on Sommarøy before walking back to your car.

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Beautiful view of Senja Island on our way down from Hillesøytoppen. The little beach is called Paradise Bay.

Sommarøy is a thriving fishing village where herring and codfish provide the main income sources.

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Great views of Sommarøy (Summer Island) from the top of Hillesøytoppen

From the top, you can look out over the big ocean! You also get a view over to the island Senja with its characteristic sharp mountains, as well as the small island Håja with its special shape that was the inspiration for the architect designing the famous Arctic Cathedral.

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The small island Håja, the inspiration for the Arctic Cathedral

The drive out to the island Hillesøy is also great, where the road goes along the shore and you will pass plenty of small beaches and fishing villages.

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Walking path to Hillesøytoppen
  • Where is it: Hillesøytoppen is located on the beautiful small island Hillesøy just outside of Sommarøy.
  • Height: 211 meters above sea level
  • Distance to walk: 2 km both ways
  • Time: 1 hour (round-trip)
  • How to get there: It is easiest to get to Hillesøy with a car (1 hour). From Tromsø center, drive to Kvaløya and follow the signs to Sommarøy. Hillesøy is the small island just outside of Sommarøy, there is a very small bridge connecting these to islands.
    You can also take bus no. 420 or 422 to Hillesøy. You can purchase tickets onboard the bus, but cash payments only, or you can buy a ticket through the app “Troms Mobillett”. You can check the bus schedule HERE (search the Travel Planner from “Tromsø Prostneset” to “Hillesøy kryss (Tromsø)” or through the app “Troms Reise”.

7. Trehørningen (283 m)

Trehørningen is another small mountain or more like a hill. It is easily accessible, with great views over islands and Skulsfjords from the top!

There is a well-marked path from the road and all the way to the top.

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View from the Trehørningen mountain

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Walking path to Trehørningen
  • Where is it: Trehørningen is on Kvaløya, next to Skulsfjord.
  • Height: 283 meters above sea level
  • Distance to walk: 3 km both ways
  • Time: 1 hour (round-trip)
  • How to get there: It is easiest to get to Trehørningen by car, it is about a 25 minutes drive from Tromso center by car. From Tromsø, drive over to Kvaløya and turn right and follow the signs towards Skulsfjord. After a while you drive to a tunnel, after the tunnel, the parking (which is free) is on the left side of the road and the path to Trehørningen is on the right side of the road.
    You can also take the bus no. 426 towards Skulsfjord. You can purchase tickets onboard the bus, but cash payments only, or you can buy a ticket through the app “Troms Mobillett”. You can check the bus schedule HERE (search the Travel Planner from “Tromsø Prostneset” to “Skulsfjord (Tromsø)” or through the app “Troms Reise”.

There you have it, our seven favorite easy hikes to do in Tromso, Norway that has an awesome view. You can even do several of these walks on the same day as they are located in the same area (see the map at the top of this article where all seven mountains are marked).

Before you head out into the mountains, remember to check the weather forecast. Yr.no or the free app Yr is great for the weather forecast in Norway.  Don´t go hiking if the weather forecast is bad.

If you are planning on going snowshoeing, snowboarding, or skiing during the winter season (November – April), check the avalanche danger before heading out into steep mountains. Varsom.no is great for avalanche forecast. Sadly, every winter people die from avalanches in Tromso and the areas outside of Tromso.

All of these hikes can be done both autumn, spring, summer and winter. In winter (November – April) there is usually lots of snow in Tromso, so it might be a good idea to bring or rent snowshoes or skis. You can rent all sorts of hiking equipment both for a day trip and an overnight hiking trip at Tromso Outdoor which are located in downtown Tromso.

Remember to bring warm and windproof clothes both summer and winter, as the temperature and weather may suddenly change. Check out our ultimate packing list for Tromso. 

Have a great hiking trip in Tromso!


Where To Stay In Tromso

Norway, in general, is quite expensive when it comes to accommodation and dining, and Tromso is no exception. Tromso is a small city with a compact downtown, so everything is within a short walking distance. Here are our favorite hotels in Tromsø, at different price ranges.

Also, click here to read our complete guide to our favorite Tromso areas and hotels.

Mid-Range

Clarion Collection Hotel With

Clarion Hotel With TromsoHotel With, as it is known locally, has the perfect location right by Tromso Harbour with a beautiful view over the sea and over to the Arctic Cathedral, the Tromso Bridge, Tromsdalstinden mountain and Fjellheisen. You are right in the middle of everything if you choose to stay at this hotel, very close to all the city's restaurants and shops.

An extra plus with this hotel is that you get free coffee/tea and Norwegian waffles with sour cream, jam and brown cheese (Espen`s favorite!) in the afternoon (from 15 to 18 o`clock) and a free meal in the evening (from 18 to 21 o`clock). This makes this hotel a good value for your money as eating out is expensive. A friend of mine from my class at the University used to work here during the weekends, and the staff here is well trained and provides good service and help to the guests.
Click here for the latest prices

Clarion Collection Hotel Aurora

Clarion Hotel Aurora TromsoPinNext door to Hotel With is its sister hotel Clarion Collection Hotel Aurora. This hotel also has free waffles in the afternoon and an evening meal included in the price. The extra plus of this hotel is the rooftop jacuzzi and sauna! Here you can relax in the evenings and watch the northern lights from the hot tub. Sounds pretty sweet if you ask me!
click here for the latest prices


The Edge Hotel

The Edge Hotel TromsoThe new "star" when it comes to hotels in Tromso is, however, The Edge. It is brand new and has an excellent bar and restaurant which is also very popular among the locals in Tromso. You really should try the hamburger, it is great! The breakfast at The Edge is maybe the best in town with everything you can imagine. Located by the harbor, but further south than the hotels above, and close to the Tourist Information office.
Click here for the latest prices

City Living Hotel & Apartments
This apartment hotel has a central location on the street just above Tromso's main street Storgata. The apartments have a small kitchen, which is handy for making breakfast, lunch or even dinner inside. That way you can save some money by shopping at one of the close-by supermarkets and cook your own food.

The hotel also has a laundry room that the guests can use for free. Very handy as dry cleaning is expensive and there are no other options in town if you want to get your clothes washed. There is, however, no daily cleaning service, but you can help yourself to coffee and clean sheets and towels whenever you want from the second floor. You can easily get here by the Airport Bus (Flybuss) from the airport.
Click here for the latest prices

Budget

Amalie Hotel
This is a small budget hotel and a less expensive option than the hotels above. It has an excellent location just next to the big and more expensive Radisson Blu Hotel. An extra bonus is unlimited free coffee and tea the whole day and complimentary waffles in the afternoon. The rooms are a bit small but well equipped with kettle, tea/coffee, mini-fridge, iron, and hairdryer. You get a lot for your money. Great breakfast included in the price.
Click here for the latest prices

Comfort Hotel Xpress Tromso
This is a budget hotel with a perfect location in Grønnegata, the street adjacent to the city's main street Storgata. The hotel rooms are clean, new and fresh, but a bit small. If you are out all day on tours and sightseeing, then the small rooms will not be a problem. There is no daily housekeeping service. There is no restaurant in the hotel, but it is very close to all the restaurants and cafes that Tromso has to offer. You can get a breakfast discount of 50 % (150 KR) at their sister hotel Clarion Hotel, which is well worth the money as you can eat all you want at their excellent breakfast buffet.
Click here for the latest prices

Smarthotel Tromso
Another budget option with small rooms but well equipped, fresh and modern. The hotel has an excellent location right in the middle of downtown Tromso. You get breakfast included in the price, which is fairly good. You get free coffee and tea the whole day. Great value for your money!
Click here for the latest prices

How To Get Around Tromso

Tromso is located on a small island called Tromsoya which is only 23 km². The island is 10 km long from the northernmost tip to the southernmost tip, and there is a very popular walking path from one end to the other called Lysloypa. Lysloypa is great for walking, running, cycling and skiing.

Tromso city center is very compact, and most of the things in this guide are within walking distance.

If you plan to hike several of these mountains and to head out to Kvaloya, I recommend that you rent a car. This will save you a lot of time. is more convenient and reliable than the bus.

Taking The Bus In Tromso

If you prefer to take the bus, there are many city buses, covering all areas of Tromso both on Tromsoya, Kvaloya, and the mainland (Tromsdalen). The city buses run every day from early morning around 6 o`clock till around midnight. Most bus routes operate on two departures per hour schedule but during the rush hours in the morning and afternoon, there are often as many as four.

You can buy tickets on the bus but you can only pay in cash and a single ticket cost NOK 50 (adult). You can save money by buying the bus ticket up front at a kiosk or at the Tourist Information at Prostneset. Then the ticket costs NOK 30 (adult).

If you plan to take the bus a lot one day, you can buy a day ticket (valid for 24 hours). It costs NOK 110 (adult) if you buy it onboard the bus, a day ticket for children cost NOK 55.

There is also a great mobile app called “Troms Mobillett” (just search for it in App Store or Google Play) where you can buy tickets for all buses in the whole area of Troms, as well as all ferries and speedboats (Hurtigbaat). A bus ticket for the city buses in Tromso only cost NOK 29,60 (adult) with this app, while a child is NOK 19. You should also download the free app called “Troms Reise” where you can easily find routes, bus stops and when the bus departs (also in real time, if it delayed it will show up in the app).

There are some district buses running to Kvaloya, but there are very few departures. So if you want to head out of Tromso and for instance do some hiking in the mountains on Kvaloya, you really should rent a car.

Renting A Car In Tromso

If you want to explore the areas outside the city center, then a rental car is a great option in Tromso. It's easiest to book the car online before you travel and then pick it up your car at the airport when you arrive. Tromso Airport has cars from several international car rental agencies such as Avis, Hertz, Sixt, Europcar, and Budget.

Click here for the latest prices and to see the available cars to rent in Tromso

PIN IT FOR LATER!
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Do you like hiking? What is your favorite walk? Which of these hikes seem most tempting to you? Do you have other hikes to recommend in Tromso? Please leave a comment in the comment area below, thank you! 

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Written by Maria Wulff Hauglann

Maria is a Norwegian travel nerd who has explored more than thirty countries on four continents. She holds a master's degree in Computer Science, as well as an MBA. In 2014 while on a year-long trip across South East- Asia, Maria co-founded the travel blog Nerd Nomads to help others get out and explore the world. In 2018 she left her day job permanently for a life of full-time travel. See our about page for more about Maria.

175 Comments

  1. This is a great post thanks for sharing, your photos are spectacular. Fløya, sounds like a perfect hike to see the Northern lights.
    We are planning a trip to Norway in December, do you have any recommendations where to stay in Tromsø?

    Reply
    • Hi Nicola,

      Thank you so much!

      If the northern lights are strong, Fløya is perfect for northern lights watching. But if it is not as strong, then the lights from Tromso city will pollution your view and you will not be able to see the northern lights as clear. So it all depends on the weather and how much northern lights there is.

      If the northern lights are weak, however, you should head out of the city. Kattfjordeidet and Ersfjord are my favourite places to see the northern lights. They are close to eachother (only a 10 minute drive) so you can easily go to both these places on one evening.

      If you want to stay out of the city, then Budeia Lodge is excellent, located close to Ersfjord (only a five minute walk). This place is perfect for watching the northern lights and whale watching (the wales swim right by this lodge hunting fish). It is run by my cousin Laila: http://budeialodge.no. There are several great hiking mountains close by, like Nattmålstinden that I write about in this article.

      As for accommodation in Tromsø, the Clarion Collection Hotel With is very popular as they serve free evening meals. It is also located right in the middle of the city. It is a bit expensive though. The Edge Hotel is very nice, and brand new with excellent location right in the middle of Tromso city. Smarthotel is cheaper and also with good location. It all depends on your budget.

      Have a great trip to Tromso in December! Crossing my fingers that you will see the northern lights! Maybe I`ll see you there! 🙂

      -Maria-

      Reply
    • Wow, so cool that you did some of these hikes! Thank you so much for commenting back and telling me, you really made my day! 🙂 Tromso is great for hiking both summer and winter!

      Happy travels! 🙂

      -Maria-

      Reply
  2. Are all these hikes doable in March ? Would I need snow shoes or could I go without? Would be late March. P.S. Absolutely loved this post!

    Reply
    • Hi Isabel,

      Thank you so much! Yes, all of these hikes are doable in March, but there might be some snow so you should wear snow shoes or skis. You can rent snow shoes at several places in Tromso city.

      Have a great trip to Tromso! Crossing my fingers that you will have nice weather so that you can see the northern lights!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  3. Hey Maria,
    Firstly, awesome photographs I must say. Me and my wife are planning to travel to Tromso in last week of March and looking at these photos, cannot wait to get there. We were relieved to hear that these hikes are doable in March. We would love to do as many hikes as we can in the list. Would you advise on camping at any of these places, assuming it is allowed? We thought that would be the best way to catch the Northern Lights, hence checking.

    Reply
    • Hi Srinivas,

      Thank you so much!

      Yes, these hikes are doable in March. I am actually back in Tromso now, after a trip to Sri Lanka and Thailand, and it is plenty of snow here. It snowed yesterday too, so it is light powder snow here at the moment. Therefore you should hike with skis or snowshoes. You can rent this in Tromso.

      It is great to go camping on these hikes, and it is allowed. In Norway, we have something called “allemannsrett”, meaning something like “public right of access”. This means that everybody has the right to use and go camping in the mountains and the coastline in Norway. There is a lot of snow here now, and it can be pretty cold during the night, so bring camping equipment suitable for winter. It was -7 last night.

      There are several options for renting a cabin too in the Tromso area if you want to stay outside of the city, for instance on airbnb. Two of these hikes (Ørnfløya and Hillesøytoppen) are located very close to Sommarøy Arctic Hotel: https://www.sommaroy.no/en/. It is a great hotel located on Sommarøy Island, and is the perfect place to spend the night and watching the northern lights.

      Have a great trip to Tromso!! Maybe I`ll see you around on one of these mountains? 🙂

      -Maria-

      Reply
  4. Hi Maria,
    I came across your blog last week when looking for travel suggestions for Bangkok. Thanks for the great tips btw! I bookmarked your page and browsing through it I found this article about Tromsø, which got me really excited! I did an internship there during summer quite some years ago and completely fell in love with the place, so I came back to see the northern lights a few years later. I did some of the hikes you describe, or the neighbouring peaks like Sørtinden and Kjølen and also Tromsdalstinden and after reading your article I feel like I should definitely pay Tromsø a visit again soon. Congrats on your blog and your beautiful home!
    Cheers from Sydney,
    Elisabeth

    Reply
    • Hi Elisabeth,

      Wow, so cool that you have been to Tromsø on an internship and later to see the northern lights and doing some hiking! I really like hiking Kjølen and Tromsdalstinden, although they are pretty long hikes. I have never been to Sørtinden, have just seen it from the road, will definitely check it out one day.

      Yeah, you should definitely come back to Tromsø! It is a long flight from Sydney, however. We actually studied in Brisbane and went down to Sydney in our easter holiday. It is such an amazing city and I really want to come back to Australia and Sydney one day! We are actually thinking about buying a camper van in Australia and drive around the country. It would be a dream come through.

      Cheers, and happy travels!
      Maria

      Reply
  5. Hi Maria, i will be in Tromso, in May. I have a window of opportunity to do one of your suggested hikes. I will need to use the local bus, and am travelling solo……which one would you advise. Many thanks. Lisa

    Reply
    • Hi Lisa,

      Since you will use the local bus, I recommend that you choose one of the mountains that are near Tromso. Fløya and Rødtind will be good choices for you. You can walk over the bridge from Tromso center to the parking at Cable Car (30 min walk), where the path up to Fløya starts. Or you can take the local bus (10 min from center of Tromso). You can easily reach Rødtind by bus no. 42 (20 min bus ride from Tromso center).

      Have a great trip to Tromso in May, and have a nice hiking trip!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  6. Hi Maria! Wow amazing photos and really helpful article, may i know that which camera do you use for taking such like these types of wonderful photos ?
    Happy Travel Maria!
    Shoaib from Pakistan

    Reply
  7. Hi Maria,

    This compilation is amazing. Could you advise me if it is possible to get to Brosmetinden via public transport? Or only by car which would mean I would have to cab there?

    I am also planning to cover Ørnfløya and Nattmålsfjellet . Would it possible to do all these 3 mountains together?

    I was planning to stay in Tromso city centre, and travel out for these mountains would it be convenient or would you have a better suggestion?

    Many thanks in advance!

    Warm Regards,
    Maureen

    Reply
    • Hi Thomas!

      Great to hear that you are coming to Tromso in July! The hiking is awesome at that time. Have a great trip to the Arctic and enjoy the hiking! I might be in Tromso too in July, maybe I`ll see you on some of these mountains. 🙂

      -Maria-

      Reply
      • Hello! Thank you for your good information.
        My boyfriend and I are travelling to Tromsø and Lofoten next week, we are planning to set up a tent, I was wondering what are the instructions and where can we set it up?
        Thank you in advance.
        Afra

        Reply
        • Hi Afra,

          Sorry for my late reply. We were actually in Lofoten last week and had a fantastic trip. Lofoten is amazing!! Can’t wait to write articles about Lofoten on our blog.

          You can basically set up a tent wherever you want in Norway, except for private property (farmland, private gardens, public parks, and the tent must be at least 150 m from the closest house). You are also only allowed to have your tent up in the same place for max 2 nights in a row.

          Hope you are having a wonderful time in Tromsø and Lofoten!

          All the best,
          Maria

          Reply
  8. Hi Maria,

    I am travelling to Tromsø in August and since I’m travelling along I am debating whether to rent a car or not. Thank you so much for all of the tips with these hikes, including the bus suggestions!! I will make a note of them all 🙂

    Would you recommend cycling in the area too? Are the good bike rental companies?

    Thanks,

    Eva

    Reply
    • Hi Eva,

      Awesome that you are coming to Tromsø this August! Yay! You should definitely rent a car if you want to do some hiking and see the area around Tromsø city. There are very few buses going outside of the city during the school summer holiday (23rd of June to 22nd of August).

      Tromsø and its surrounding areas are great for cycling! You can rent bikes at Tromsø Outdoor.

      Have a great trip to Tromsø! Maybe I`ll see you around here then. 🙂

      -Maria-

      Reply
  9. Hi Maria, great blog, very professional and informative. Have short stay in Tromsø and would like to do two of the hikes you described. Arrive early on July 23 am with overnight stay then depart next day on an evening flight bound for Leknes. Thus actually have two days (although not full). There should be no problem with Fløya on either day, would love to bus out of Tromsø and hike Brosmetinden on one of the days but not skilled in reading the Norwegian bus schedule. Concerned with the return, how many and assume the return bus is waived down? I am a fairly experienced hiker, walks across Scotland (TGO), Nepal treks, GR20, et al., so two hours for the actual hike should be sufficient but how much risk is there of finding myself stranded. Again great blog, and thanks.

    Reply
    • Hi Robert,

      Thanks for your nice word about our blog! Really appreciate it!

      As you say, Fløya is no problem for you to get to on either days 23rd or 24th of July. You can take the bus, walk over the bridge from Tromsø center or take a taxi.

      I`m afraid that getting out to Brosmetind in July is unfortunately impossible by bus as the buses don`t run during school holidays (all schools in Norway have a summer break in July). So you should definitely rent a car! And at least since you have limited time, as having your own car is more efficient timewise. Then you can drop the car at the airport (several car rental offices there) when you fly out to Leknes on Monday 24th of July.

      I would say that the only mountain you can take the bus to in July is Rødtind. Take bus no. 42 from Tromsø Center, bus stop S4 in the street Sjøgata, to Storelv. It runs often and leaves each 20 min. We actually live close to Storelv bus stop where you will get off to hike Rødtind, and I take this bus all the time. The bus ride is only about 20 min.

      Have a great trip to Tromsø and enjoy the hiking!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  10. Wow this is a really helpful article!! We’re travelling to Tromsø at the end of July and I feel like I’m going dizzy from trying to research some good day hikes. We find UT.no super confusing when trying to figure out how to get somewhere, and other sites don’t have pictures so it’s hard to know if it’s worth it. We’ll definitely do one of these. Do you think a day trip to Blåvatnet is too ambitious without at car? Thanks for your great post!
    Jay

    Reply
    • Hi Jay,

      Thank you so much! Your comment made my day! 🙂

      So cool that you are coming to Tromsø! I agree, ut.no is great if you know the area a bit, but if you`ve never been here before it is not easy knowing where to start.

      Do you mean Blåvatnet in Lyngen? It is a bit out of Tromso, so yes you would need a car to get there. It is about a 2-hour drive with a car, including a ferry trip, to the parking spot in Sørlenangen from where you start walking up to Blåvatnet. I would say it is very difficult without a car, sorry. You can ofcourse rent a bicycle and bicycle out there.

      If you don`t want to rent a car, then your best choices are Rødtind (on Kvaløya, take bus no. 42 from Sjogata in downtown Tromso to Storelv bus stop) and Fløya (you can walk from downtown Tromso).

      Have a great trip to Tromsø and enjoy your hiking trips! Crossing my fingers that you will get good weather!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  11. Hello. Thanks for helpful info!! Are the hike time and distance noted for roundtrip or one way? We plan to do theee or four of the hikes you have detailed with our toddler (we have hiking pack to carry her). Do you recommend any hikes in lyngen alps we will be staying in lyngen north and already plan to do gorsa on our way there.

    Reply
    • Hi Charu,

      Thank you, glad my article could be of help to you!

      The approximately hiking time is for the total round-trip, both up and down.

      Wow, lucky toddler who will be doing these hikes at such an early age! 🙂

      Hmm, as for the Lyngen Alps the mountains there are pretty steep and tall, so they are more challenging and take longer time than the hikes I have listed in this article. I am not that familiar with hiking in the Lyngen Alps, so you should just ask the people that you will be staying at in Lyngen North.

      The Blåvatnet (meaning “Blue Lake”) in Lyngen is really nice, however, and has a fantastic ice-blue color and is surrounded by mountain tops. It is only 189 meter high (above sea level), and the walking is about 8 km in easy terrain. You drive from Tromsø to Sør-Lenangsbotn. From Tromsø, drive to Breivikeidet, and take the ferry across to Svendsby in Lyngen. Then take left once you get off the ferry at Svendsby.

      Have a great trip to Tromsø and Lyngen, and enjoy the hiking! Crossing my fingers that you will get nice weather. Right now it is raining a lot here and it`s only 9 degrees Celsius, brrrr, shitty summer so far! 🙁

      -Maria-

      Reply
  12. Hi Maria,
    We found your suggestions for relatively easy hikes really helpful. We managed Hillesøy and Brosmetind and thoroughly enjoyed them both.
    I found the climb up Hillesøy “challenging” and was glad you suggested the alternative descent which made a lovely round walk.
    Brosmetind was simply stunning on a fine sunny day.
    Hilay

    Reply
    • Hi Hilary,

      Wow, so cool that you did both Hillesøy and Brosmetind!! Yeah, Hillesøy is a bit steep and challenging, I agree. The rope that you can grab on to and kind of “pull” you up helps a bit though. And it is luckily not that far (211 meters).

      Ah, Brosmetind is definitely my favorite hike, so glad to hear that you liked it too. We are actually heading out to Brosmetind now for a midnight hike in the Midnight Sun. 🙂

      Thank you so much for commenting, I love hearing from our readers! Cheers!

      -Maria-

      Reply
    • Hei Pernilla,

      Ååååå så kult!!!! The weather is amazing at the moment, perfect for hiking. I went to Nattmålstinden yesterday and it was great! Unusually warm and sunny, and luckily not that many mosquitoes or flies.

      Ha det superfint i Tromsø! Nyt det fantastiske været!

      Happy travels!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  13. Hej Maria!
    Tack för fina tips på vandringar i Tromsö! (I will continue in English for everyone to be able to follow.)
    We have been doing the hikes to Rødtind (today) and Fløya (yesterday). We made a very long extra hike once we arrived at Rødtind, could have walked forever up there! Sooo very beautiful!
    We have been extremely lucky with the weather and cannot believe how beautiful the surroundings are here in Tromsø. We will alas be leaving tomorrow, but I hope to come back one day.
    Happy hiking, god tur!

    Reply
    • Hei Cecilia,

      Wow, så kult at dere gikk på både Rødtind og Fløya!! Way to go!

      Yeah, Rødtind is great for hiking! And as you say, it is possible to walk even further back and over to the neighbouring mountains Kjølen and Finlandsfjellet. These mountains are my childhood “backyard” and where I did my first hikes as a little girl with my parents. It is a great hiking area with amazing views, and easily accessible from Tromsø city.

      You were sooooo lucky with the weather!! It has been fantastic the whole week. It looks like the nice weather will be over by Sunday, though, so you leave right on time. 🙂 I`m so glad to hear that you like Tromsø! Hope you come back soon too!

      Tusen takk for kommentaren! Kjempetrivelig å høre fra våre lesere! God tur hjem til Sverige!

      Hilsen Maria

      Reply
  14. Hi Maria,

    I’m traveling to tromso with my mom and sis on the first week of October. Would these hikes still be recommended or would it be too cold/slippery/icy? We come from a tropical country. Haha! And are there proper trails for all the hikes? Any specific time we should aim for for all these hikes? Such as early in the morning or sunset etc 🙂
    And do you know if there’s any kayaking that is safe for us to do on our own instead of a tour? Like a rental.
    Thanks a bunch

    Reply
  15. Hi Maria
    I’m glad I came across your blog about the hikes in Tromsø! Very helpful and beautiful pictures! I have also read the article about the Northern Lights.
    My oldest daughter(15) and I will go on a mother-daughter trip in the last week of October, leaving dad and little sister at home ;-).
    Maud really wanted to go north and we chose Tromsø as our destination. We will have 3 whole days there and we are really looking forward to exploring the city and its beautiful surroundings.
    Of course we hope we will be lucky enough to see the Northern Lights (maybe book a tour) and I would love to go whale watching if that’s possible in October!
    We also want to go hiking and I think the one to Fløya will be nice for us. We will have to come back another time to do some of the other hikes :-). It all looks so beautiful.
    My daughter is vegan and I’m very happy we found one Vegan restaurant in the center of Tromsø!
    Happy travels Maria!
    Karin from The Netherlands

    Reply
    • Hi Karin,

      Wow, so cool that you and your daughter are doing a “girls trip” to Tromsø!!! Crossing my fingers that you will get to see both the Northern Lights and whales!

      As long as you get a clear sky, you should have good chances of seeing the Northern Lights as the evenings are dark in October, and there might even be snow here by then. The whales usually come into the fjords around Tromsø during late October/ beginning of November and stay here hunting for fish until January/ February. So they might already be here the last week of October, but you never know, the whales don`t go by the calendar, unfortunately, so this changes a bit from year to year.

      Fløya is an excellent mountain to go hiking for a 15-year-old, where you get better and better view of Tromsø city and its surrounding mountains with each step. And if the weather is bad, or there is snow, you can always opt for the cable car that takes you up to the same mountain. Or at least the take cable car down. Glad you found a Vegan restaurant.

      Have an awesome trip to Tromsø in October!!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  16. Hi Maria,
    I wanted to say a big thank you for this blog entry as I stayed 9 days in Tromsø and these hikes were fantastic. I made 6 out of the 7 (unfortunately didn’t find the time for Rødtind), specially last week when the weather was so great, and the views were always stunning.
    As I came to Tromsø specially for photography, this allowed me to shoot fantastic landscapes of this beautiful area!
    I specially loved Brosmetinden and the duo Ørnfløya/Hillesøytoppen, but Nattmålsfjellet had a spectacular view to offer too. And I had a great moment on Trehørningen: I was sitting there, admiring the view, when suddenly a Reindeer came by, staring at me for a moment and then going his way along the hill… great moment!!

    So thanks a lot again! 🙂
    Stéphane

    Reply
    • Hi Stéphane,

      Woooooow, thank you so much! Your comment made my day! 🙂 Your photos are awesome, love your Instagram feed! I see that you even managed to capture a great shot of the reindeer on Trehørningen. I`m impressed that you did 6 of these hikes in 9 days, wow! Brosmetinden is my personal favourite, glad you liked it too.

      Thank you so much for commenting and linking to your great photos! Will be following you on Instagram.

      -Maria-

      Reply
      • Happy you like my Instagram feed 🙂 For the moment the pictures of Tromsø/Kvaøya on my Instagram feed are just some photos made with my iPhone, but as I shoot mainly with film cameras (and shot a lot during these beautiful hikes), there’s more to come as soon as I have processed and scanned all the films of my trip. They’ll be uploaded on my lomohome and the best ones will be on Instagram as well, so expect some more photos from Tromsø and Kvaløya in the coming months! 🙂

        Reply
  17. Hi Maria,

    I would like to try some of your hikes later this month, can you please tell me which hiking maps I should buy [I can get some in the UK from a specialist shop] or should I wait until I get to Tromso?

    Your photos and descriptions are really inspiring.

    Thanks,

    Mike

    Reply
    • Hi Mike,

      Great to hear that you are coming to Tromso and plan to do some hiking! For these seven easy hikes, you don`t really need a hiking map as the paths are easy to find and follow. Most of these hikes and mountains are on the island Kvaloya (just outside of the island Tromsoya where downtown of Tromso is located). So if you want to buy a map, you should buy one of Kvaloya. Or you can just wait till you get to Tromso and buy one here.

      Have a great trip to Tromso!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  18. Hi Maria,

    I’m traveling to tromso with my mom and sis on the first week of October. Would these hikes still be recommended or would it be too cold/slippery/icy? We come from a tropical country. Haha! And are there proper trails for all the hikes? Any specific time we should aim for for all these hikes? Such as early in the morning or sunset etc 🙂
    And do you know if there’s any kayaking that is safe for us to do on our own instead of a tour? Like a rental.
    Thanks a bunch

    Reply
    • Hi Stephanie,

      So sorry I missed your previous comment, just noticed it now that you have already commented without me replying to it. I will try to answer your questions the best I can 🙂

      It might be snow, or at least frost on the ground, in the beginning of October. Or it might not. That`s the problem, we never know when the winter is coming up here in the Arctic. Last year we got snow very late, in December. So it`s hard to say. But these 7 hikes are quite easy and short and not particularly steep, except for Hillesøytoppen which is a bit steep and might be slippery. You will, however, have no problem doing these walks even if there is some snow on the ground. Bring warm clothes, a beanie, gloves, proper hiking boots, something warm to drink and something to eat, and you will have a great walk! You should, of course, check the weather forecast at YR.no before you head out for some hiking.

      Yes, there are proper trails to all these hikes, the trails are easy to spot and easy to follow.

      It starts to get dark around 6 p.m. (18:00) in October, so you should be sure to be back down from the mountain by then. Or bring a headlamp. The sun comes up around 7 a.m. (07:00).

      Tromso and the area around Tromso and Kvaloya are great for kayaking! There are several tours that you can join, or you can just rent a kayak from for instance Alfa Fritid and 69 degrees North at Sommaroy Island. You should just contact them and ask for kayak rental oportunities.

      Have a great trip to Tromsø in October!!! Maybe I`ll see you around on some of these hikes. 🙂

      -Maria-

      Reply
      • Thank you very much Maria!! Can’t thank you enough for the very detailed information. I was half worried if any of my comments went through and very grateful to have stumbled on this page 🙂 Yes, we’re looking forward to the trip in October and yes, who knows maybe we’ll bump into you on our trip. 😀 Haha.. have a great week!

        Reply
  19. Hi Maria,

    Thank you for this post – some of these hikes are exactly what we’re looking for! We’re planning a trip to Tromsø in the end of December, and figured there wouldn’t be a better start of the year than do some hikes on the 1st of January. Since we’re aware that there probably aren’t many hours of sunlight during these days, do you think it would be doable to drive to Brosmetinden very early so we can be there when the first daylights show up, and do another hike on the way back to Tromsø, like Nattmålsfjellet? We’ve also read your other article about the Northern Lights, and it sounds amazing to try the DIY Northern Lights Tour 🙂 we might even combine this on the same day with the hiking, since we’ll already be out of town anyways.

    Thanks again for this post, we’re looking forward to our trip to Tromsø!
    Sander.

    Reply
    • Hi Sander and Angelique!

      So cool that you are coming to Tromsø at the end of December! Christmas is a very cozy time in Tromsø, but be aware that some places closes during the Christmas holiday 24.- 26. of December.

      December and January are the darkest months in Tromsø with no sun at all. So the daylight is very short and limited, there is only a little light a couple of hours around 11-13 o`clock if there are no clouds. If it is cloudy it will hardly get any daylight at all. So you should bring head lamps and check the weather forecast before you head out.

      It is doable to do both Brosmetind and Nattmålstinden on the same day, but the light is limited so it will be dark and you will have to use a head lamp. If you are lucky you might see the northern lights too! Both these two mountains are perfect for northern light spotting as there are hardly any artificial lights in these areas.

      There might also be snow in December/ January. If you want you can rent snow shoes or skiis at Tromso Outdoor.

      Have a great trip to Tromsø!!! Maybe I`ll see your around as we will be celebrating Christmas with my family in Tromsø this year.

      -Maria-

      Reply
  20. Hi Maria & Espen:
    We stayed two days in August in Tromsø, before heading down to Lofoten, and we did Brosmetinden, Nattmålsfjellet, Ørnfløya and Hillesøytoppen.
    We all found them lovely, although the best we found was Borsmetinden.
    Thank you for the detailed information; is everything a good hiker needs before heading out.
    We love Norland!
    Greetings from Bizkaia!
    Iñigo & Leyre

    Reply
    • Hi Iñigo and Leyre,

      Woooow, that is awesome! I`m really impressed that you did four hikes in two days! You must be quite fit! 🙂

      I agree, Brosmetinden is the best and my absolute favourite mountain out of these seven hikes! Lofoten has some really nice hiking too.

      I`ve never been to the Bizkaia region of Spain, would love to visit Bilbao one day. Looks like a beautiful city! I`ve heard that there are some great hiking options in Bizkaia too.

      -Maria-

      Reply
      • Yeah!, Bizkaia and the whole Basque Country have great walks. We here are mad about montains (see video below). We have an ancient saying in euskara language: “non gogoa han zangoa”, that means “where is my will there goes my feet”.

        Although I must say that my great love is Pyrenees, especially Ordesa Valley, no so far from here. Hope you can come here some day, we will be happy to show you beautiful hikes, and exquisite meals!

        https://youtu.be/PeayPuzSBYY

        Best Regards!!

        Reply
  21. I`m really impressed . Marvels Photography. Especially your planing was very good.Thank you for sharing. I’m really enjoyed when I’m reading your post Keep it

    Reply
  22. Hi Maria this is my personal comment I like your attitude (not only like more than). You respect every one and replies every comment. I learn so many things. I’m big fan of you. My English is very poor. Actually I’m student I improve my communication skills that way I read blogs. No one replaced your blogs. Hat’s of to your patience. I want to say So many words but I don’t know how to express in my words. Thank you

    Reply
    • Hi again Jessy!

      Awwww, thank you sooooo much for your nice comment! Really appreciate it, you are awesome! 🙂

      All the best to you!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  23. Great article and awesome photos. We are visiting Tromsø right now and just completed the hike up to Fløya with a friend that stays in Tromsø. We were also lucky enough to have seen the aurora last night.

    Reply
    • Hi Marius & Theunis,

      Thanks a million! Wow, so cool that you are in Tromsø and that you have hiked up to Fløya! September has been such an amazing month weather wise with amazing northern lights almost every evening. So happy to hear that you got to experience it! Looking forward to reading and seeing photos from Tromsø on your blog! 🙂

      Happy travels and all the best!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  24. Hi Maria,

    I am a photographer myself and I have to say, your blog is really informative and the photographs are really beautiful. Initially i was only interested in doing dog sledding and northern light tours in Tromso, now i want to do the hikes! You have suggested some driving to the places. Can I ask is it safe to drive there during winter? I am actually planning to go next year in March (still very far away i know but very excited!). I am abit worried about the road conditions cause I have no experience driving during winter.

    Andrew, from Singapore

    Reply
    • Hi Andrew,

      Thank you so much! Really appreciate hearing from a fellow photographer! So cool that you are planning a winter trip to Tromso in March! Yes, it is best and more convenient to hire a car, especially if you want to do some of these hikes. You can do two of these hikes by bus, mountain number 2 Fløya and mountain number 3 Rødtind. To do the other ones, you have to rent a car as the buses are very limited.

      It will probably be snow here in Tromso by then, so the roads might be icy and snowy, but the rental car will have snow tires so it will be no problem driving. As long as you drive slow and easy you should be fine. We also drive on the right side of the road here in Norway, the opposite of what you do in Singapore but you will get used to it pretty quickly. The traffic is light here compared to Singapore, so I think you will be fine.

      Have a great trip to Tromso in March! Crossing my fingers that you will see the Northern Lights and have nice weather! Happy hiking!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  25. Hi Maria, awesome article! You really know what a hiker needs:)
    I’m an avid fan of Norway and have visited Stavanger and Odda for some hikes. My husband and I are planning to go back in late Feb for my birthday. May I know if these hikes can be done during that time?

    Reply
    • Hi Nesty,

      Thank you so much!! So cool that you like Norway and plan to visit Tromsø this time!! The nature and mountains are even more spectacular up here in the north than Stavanger and Odda.

      The days are short in February, with only a couple of hours of daylight each day, so bring a headlamp and start early in the morning. There will probably be snow too. These hikes are doable in February, but you might want to hire some snowshoes or skies. You can for instance rent snowshoes at Tromso Outdoor Rentals.

      Have a great trip to Tromso and enjoy the hiking!! Crossing my fingers that you will see the northern lights.

      -Maria-

      Reply
  26. This is a very useful article and beautiful photos. I’m just planning a trip to Tromso at the beginning of November. And for sure I will follow these hiking. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  27. Thank you Maria,

    I am reading through your tips in preparations for a conference in town next week. I plan to stay the weekend after and Hike around. I will definitely follow some of your recommended Hikes.

    Reply
    • Hi Shahar,

      Wow, awesome that you are coming here to Tromsø next week! The weather has been excellent the whole September and October, hope it stays this way until you arrive so that you get to see the northern lights.

      Happy hiking, and have a great time in Tromsø!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  28. Hi Janeta,

    Thank you so much! So cool that you are coming here to Tromsø in November! Hope that you get to see the northern lights, it has been exploding on the sky almost every evening since September. There is no snow here now, but there might be some in November, who knows. So bring warm winter clothes and proper hiking boots, and a head lamp as there will be little day light in November.

    Have a great trip to Tromsø and enjoy the hiking!

    -Maria-

    Reply
  29. Hi, Thank you for this great article and photos!
    Actually we are on the way to Tromsö and I was wondering if it is possible to go to Håja somehow?
    Many thanks
    Norbert

    Reply
    • Hi Norbert,

      Thank you so much! Hmm, yes it is possible to go to the small island Håja, but there is no ferry out there so you will have to charter a private boat. Maybe Sommarøy Arctic Hotel knows or has a boat you can rent: https://www.sommaroy.no/. You should send them an email.

      Have a great time in Tromsø! Best of luck on getting out to Håja!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  30. Hello Maria – very useful resource – perfect.

    Would you be able to tell me if the trail Floya is well walked/marked given wintery conditions I’m expecting? Coming to Tromso last week in January for 4 nights and would like to get out and about, suspect we will need snow shoes?

    Kind regards,

    Will

    Reply
    • Hi Will,

      Thank you so much! Yes, the trail up to Fløya is well marked and also well walked as it is popular among both tourists and locals also in winter time. Right now the snow here is hard and packed due to rainy weather a couple of weeks ago and minus degrees this week. So it is perfect snow condition to walk on and I don’t think you need snow shoes.

      But if it starts snowing before you get here you can consider renting snow shoes from this place in Tromsø: http://www.tromsooutdoor.no/rentals.132007.en.html

      Have a great trip to Tromsø and enjoy your hiking to Fløya! Hope you get to see the northern lights!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  31. Hello Maria and thank you for the wonderfull pictures ! I don’t know if the question has been published but I want to go hiking Brosmetinden with my husband one 3th february, do you think it’s possible in that season ?

    Bye !

    Reply
    • Hi Sophie,

      Thank you so much!

      Yes, it is possible to hike the Brosmetind in February. The sun has just returned here in Tromso and the days are short with only a couple of hours with daylight, so start early. It is mild weather and raining here in Tromso right now, but there is plenty of snow here and there might be even more snow before 3rd of February. So you should wear skis or snowshoes if you want to go hiking.

      You can rent skis and snowshoes (as well as other winter hiking equipment) here: http://www.tromsooutdoor.no/rentals.132007.en.html

      Bring a headlamp, warm clothes, something hot to drink (tea/coffee/cocoa) and something to eat and you will have a great hiking trip in February! Have a great time in Tromso and enjoy your hiking trip to Brosmetind!

      -Maria-

      Reply
      • Thank you Maria for all your good advices 🙂

        Ok we will take our snowshoes with tromsooutdoor.
        I will give you good pictures of our trip soon !
        Bye and have a nice day
        Sophie

        Reply
        • Hi Michal,

          Cool! Yes, you should definitely go hiking in Tromso in February, although you might want to use skis or snowshoes as we have some snow here. But the sun is just back over the horizon (it has been gone for two months), so the daylight is getting longer and longer.

          Enjoy your time in Tromso!

          -Maria-

          Reply
          • Hi Maria, I am not sure whether I have asked this already (as you seem to have moderation on comments so maybe my question is not displayed yet)… Where around Tromso is there a chance to meet reindeers (except commercial offers)?

            Regard
            Michał

          • Hi Michal,

            There are plenty of reindeer on Kvaloya (the island where I live, just next to the airport). The reindeer walk around freely but Kvaloya island is big so one never know exactly where they are. Will you rent a car? If so, you can drive north on Kvaloya (take right once you have crossed the bridge) toward Kvaløyvågen, or to Skulsfjord. The Sami people that own the reindeer put out food in these areas so you might get lucky and see some reindeer.

            There are some reindeer sledding going on here, and the reindeer are in this area all the time so you might go there and just see the reindeer (not go on a sledding trip).

            If you don`t have a car, then bus no. 42 goes to Kvaloya.

            Hope you find some reindeer! Have a great time in Tromso!

            -Maria-

  32. Hi, these are really great pictures and perfect hike guides. Thank you!
    We are arriving to Tromso on Feb 3rd for a week and will definitely try on of your paths.
    One a bit different question though: except commercial offers: is there a chance to see reindeers somewhere around Tromso? Just to approach and have some closer encounter?
    Regards
    Michał

    Reply
  33. Hello, I read somewhere about some steps going up the mountain where the cable cars are, to the left of the cable car house. How are these to walk?

    Gina

    Reply
    • Hi Gina,

      Yes, there are some steps going up Floya mountain to the left of the cable car. These are great! Very easy to walk. Although they might be slippery in winter like right now it is raining and the snow is turning to ice. So you should wear spikes.

      The steps are not entirely finished, however, but there are steps almost all the way to the top. The sherpas will finish the steps this summer.

      -Maria-

      Reply
  34. Hi, great posts and great tips! Can you we do the recommended hikes in winter as well wirh snowshoes? Me and my friend are comming to tromso in february and the first hike you recommended looks awesome. Thanks for your reply! Best regards, Maria

    Reply
    • Hi Maria (love your name! 🙂 )

      Thank you so much! Yes, you can do these hikes in the winter with snowshoes. You can rent snowshoes and poles at Tromso Outdoor which is located in downtown of Tromso: http://book.tromsooutdoor.no/en/todo?filter=c%3D30714

      It has been raining here, but now it is minus degrees again, so the snow is pretty packed. You might not need snowshoes, but you should bring snowshoes with you in the car just in case.

      Brosmetinden is my favorite hiking trip in Tromso, but you should have a rental car in order to get out there (1-hour drive one way).

      Have a great trip to Tromso and enjoy the hiking! Crossing my fingers that you get nice weather and clear sky so you can see the Northern Lights!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  35. Hi,

    Awwww, thank you soooooo much!!! Yes, I try to reply to every comment on the blog as I love to help others on their travels and planning. Helping others to travel is our main reason for having this blog, we work for our reads and not the travel industry. Therefore we never do sponsor posts.

    Happy travels! 🙂

    -Maria-

    Reply
  36. Hi Maria,
    I’m so glad I stumbled across your wonderful post!
    Myself and my husband are planning our dream trip for our 40th’s next February, we are coming for 6 nights with the main aim being to see the Northern lights and explore/walk.
    Would you suggest that we are better to stay in Tromso or we were looking at apartments near Ersfjord or Kaldfjord, as we thought we would have a better chance to see the lights here without having to go on a tour/chase, or would you still recommend doing one?
    We also thought there would be more places to explore staying out of the centre.
    We will be nervously hiring a car so will hopefully be able to get around ok!
    Any help you could give would be so much appreciated!
    Thank you in advance
    Amanda

    Reply
    • Hi Amanda,

      Wow, so cool that you are heading to Tromso for to celebrate your 40th`s! February is the perfect month to see the northern lights, it has been plenty every night so far in February.

      Maybe you could stay half your trip in Tromso city, and the half (or a couple of nights) outside the city, in for instance Ersfjord or Kaldfjord? You don`t have to go on a tour to see the northern lights. Since you will hire a car (which is almost a must when going to Tromso in my opinion), you will have the chance to go wherever you want to see the northern lights and hike where you want. It is perfect! You will be fine driving a car here in Tromso, don`t worry about that. Tromso is a small city and there is not much traffic here.

      You should definitely do a dog sledding trip like we did. It was great fun, and Active Tromso even does a northern lights dog sledding trip in the evening which sounds amazing!

      Have a great trip to Tromso next February! Crossing my fingers that you will get clear sky so you can see the beautiful northern lights!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  37. Hi Maria
    I appreciate that you have put this information online. My wife and I will be visiting in June and hope to go on a hike or two. I’ve looked at several seafood menus and have not found haddock (Kolja) on the menus. Is that fish caught near Tromso and can it be found in your restaurants?
    Thank you, Michael

    Reply
    • Hi Michael,

      Thank you so much! So cool that you are heading up here to Tromso in June! June is the perfect time to go hiking in Tromso, the midnight sun is up so there will be light all day and night, and the mosquitoes have not arrived yet. 🙂

      Yes, we have plenty of haddock in the sea around Tromso, I have caught it myself many times. But in Northern Norway, this fish is called hyse and not kolje. Kolje is the south Norwegian word for this fish. Espen is from Oslo and he calls it kolje, while I (being from Tromso) calls it hyse. 🙂

      I`m sure they serve hyse at some restaurants in Tromso, but we mostly use haddock in seafood products like fish cakes and fish bolls, or smoked.

      Have a great trip to Tromso in June! You should go fishing for haddock yourself while you are in Tromso.

      -Maria-

      Reply
  38. Hi Maria,

    Thank you for the useful tips! My sister and I are planning to visit Tromso in November. We are keen in hiking Brosmetinden and Hillesoy. May I know if food places are readily available at the base of the mountains for lunch? Would also like to check if there is anything worth visiting around kvaloya island as I have about 3 hours to spare before I head to ersfjord in the late afternoon/ early evening?

    Reply
    • Hi Joanne,

      Thank you so much! Wow, so cool that you and your sister are heading to Tromso in November and plan to hike Brometinden and Hillesoy! You might want to wear snowshoes as there might be snow here in November.

      Sorry, there are no restaurants or cafes near Brosmetinden, so you will have to bring your own food and drink.

      The Sommaroy Arctic Hotel is close to Hillesoy and they have a great restaurant which is open 12 – 20:30 every day. There is also a bistro called Havfrua Kro on the island Sommaroy. Sommaroy is just next to the small island Hillesoy, connected by a bridge that you can easily walk over.

      Hmm, no there are no great attractions worth visiting on Kvaloya in November, mostly mountains and nature. Although on your way to Brosmetinden, you should stop at the beautiful sandy beach and fjord Grotfjord. Going on a dog sledding trip on Kvaloya is great fun and well worth doing!

      Have a great trip to Tromso in November!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  39. Hi Maria,

    First of all your webpage is top notch, incredible useful, it was and still is the most helpful site for us. We are going tomorrow, thursday already full with dog sledding and to see Floya. Till tuesday we of course wants to hike all your recommendations as we mainly interested in landscape photos. So the question is if you might know all of the listed places are passable nowadays?
    Thank you in advance.
    Petra

    Reply
    • Hi Petra,

      Thank you so much! Wow, great to hear that you are here in Tromso right now and have tomorrow packed with dog sledding and a trip up to Floya mountain! You should really look forward to the dog sledding, it is so much fun!

      Yes, all of these 7 hikes are doable now. But since there is some snow here, and there will be snowing the next couple of days and during the weekend, you might want to wear snowshoes. You can rent snowshoes and other equipment at Tromso Outdoor in Sjogata 14. We hiked Nattmålsfjellet a couple of weeks ago, without snowshoes, and it was ok.

      Enjoy the dog sledding trip tomorrow, and have some great hikes the rest of the week!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  40. Hi Maria and Espen,
    You’ve got a wonderful blog with lots of useful and practical information (and beatiful pictures)!

    In September 2016 I went camping around Rygge / Hvaler and it was one of the best trips in my life! Even though it was early Autumn, I saw a stunning aurora show over lake Vansjø! My fate was set then – I totally fell in love with Norway 🙂

    I’m planning a camping trip to Tromsø region for eleven days in September; your blog provided me with lots of info but still I have no idea where to go 🙂 All the advices here and elsewhere are for short hikes or day trips or they’re more car-oriented (visitromso, visitnorway, wikitravel, wikiloc websites).
    I, however, will be hiking and sleeping rough for a week and a half. Would you be so kind as to recommend the best itinerary? Or maybe point me to a website with such info?

    Or, better yet, maybe you could write a new article with advices for hiking and camping around Tromsø! 🙂 That’d be totally cool!

    Cheers,
    Alexander

    Reply
    • Hi Alexander,

      Thank you so much! Wow, sounds like you had an amazing camping trip to the south part of Norway in 2016! I can`t believe that you saw northern lights that far south, you were very lucky! It is common to see the Nothern Lights here in Tromso in September, so crossing my fingers that you will get a clear sky.

      As for hiking around Tromso for a week and a half, that is totally doable! You can easily hike on the big island Kvaloya (where I live) for a week and a half. You can, for instance, take the bus 425 from downtown of Tromso (Prostneset, just next to the tourist information Visit Tromso) to Ersfjordbotn. From there you can hike Nattmålstinden in this article (the mountain is called “Klokka 10” from that side). From there you can hike through the valley Kattfjordeidet and over to Håkøybotn or Straumsbukta. There are no cabins here to sleep in, so you will have to bring a tent and sleeping bag.

      A very popular area to go hiking in for several days is on the mainland of Tromso (Tromsdalen). A popular hiking trail is from Snarbyeidet (just east of Tromsdalen, take bus 450 from Prostneset next to the Tourist Information to Oldervik), and to Tromsdalen. You pass the high mountain Tromsdalstinden (1238 m high), which you also can hike. Or you can hike down on the other side to Ramfjord. I have done this hike (Snarbyeidet – Tromsdalen) several times, both winter and summer, and it is a great hike (38 km). There are four cabins along this route that you can sleep at and they are popular to hike between:
      Trollvassbu
      Nonsbu
      Blåkollkoia
      Skarvassbu

      Another popular hiking area is the island Senja just outside of Tromso. You can take the ferry from Sommaroy to Senja (take bus no. 420 from Prostneset in Tromso to Sommaroy, the ferry leaves from Brensholmen), and start your hike from there. Or you can take the Express Boat no. 4 from Tromso to Lysnes on Senja.

      The Norwegian Trekking Association is a good place to start for planning a hike in Norway. They have a group for Troms too: https://troms.dnt.no/, maybe you can email them and ask for hiking advice and routes to do around Tromso.

      Hehe, yeah maybe I should write an article for longer hikes and camping around Tromso! Good idea! 🙂

      Have a great trip to Tromso in September, and enjoy the hiking!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  41. Just found this great article. We were in Tromso during the end of March but mostly stayed in the city and some fjord and Northern Light tour. Our mean of transport were mostly walk and a bit of city bus.

    We are looking to go back next year for these hike. I guess we need to rent a car but we were concern about the parking.

    I believe in the city center, the best bet should be tunnel parking? Also, when you talked about parking at these mountains, are they free?

    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Hi Jet,

      Thank you so much! Wow, so awesome to hear that you were in Tromso in March! Hope you got to see the Northern Lights! 🙂

      You should definitely head back next year and do some hiking as Tromso is excellent for hiking and mountain walking. If you rent a car, you are more flexible regarding when to go hiking and when to come back as you don`t have to pay attention to a bus schedule.

      The mountains Fløya (maybe you have already been there with the cable car?) and Rødtind are both easy to get to by bus. For Fløya you can walk over the Tromso Bridge and follow the road past the Arctic Cathedral, or you can take bus no. 26 from the city center. To get to the foot of Rødtind, you can take bus no. 42 from the city center towards Eidkjosen and jump off at the stop called “Storelv Snuplass”. I actually live right by Rødtind and take this bus a lot. 🙂

      You can also take a bus to the other mountains, but the city buses don`t go here so there are not that many departures each day, especially not during weekends. So I would recommend that you rent a car if you want to do the other mountains on this list.

      There are parking spots at the start of each of these hiking paths, and yes they are all free. In the city center, I recommend that you park in the huge parking tunnel.

      Have a great time hiking the mountains around Tromso!!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  42. Hi Maria,

    I believe if you rent a car, the best bet for the parking in the city would be tunnel parking?

    Also, when you talked about the parking in these mountains, are they free?

    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Hi Jet,

      Just answered your previous comment, so sorry for my late reply! We are in Kuala Lumpur at the moment so I am a bit behind on answering comments….sorry…. 🙁

      But yes, it is best and most convenient to park in the big parking tunnel when you are in the city. There are free parking areas at the start of each of these hiking paths. The only place you will have to pay for parking is at Fløya mountain (the big parking area in front of the cable car).

      Have some excellent driving and hiking in Tromso! 🙂

      Cheers,
      Maria

      Reply
      • Thank you for the information and sorry for the duplicate posts. I open the site on different device and didn’t see that the post was in pending status.

        Reply
  43. Hey. Absolutely loved the article. Thanks for all the tips and cant wait to use them on my first ever visit to Tromso.

    We are planning to travel towards the end of October this year so just wanted to know if all or any of the above hikes can not be done during this time due to the weather conditions and if October end is a good time to visit Tromso in general?

    Thanks again 🙂

    Reply
    • Hi Stuti,

      Thank you so much! Awesome that you are going to Tromso in October!

      Yes, October is a great month to visit Tromso as you will have a high chance of seeing the northern lights if it´s not cloudy.

      The average temperature in October last year was 4,3 degrees Celsius, although it was 18 degrees 1st of October and -3 at the end of October. It´s normally no snow in Tromso in October so these hikes are great to do in October. Just bring some warm clothes, something hot to drink on a thermos, and good hiking boots and you will have some excellent hikes. It might also be some rain in October, so bring waterproof and windproof jackets and trousers. And bring a headlamp as the sun sets around 16/17:00 at the end of October.

      October is also not high season, so the accommodation prices might be a little lower and the city is not packed with tourists.

      Have a great trip to Tromso in October and enjoy your hikes! Crossing my fingers that you will get to see the northern lights!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  44. Hi maria,
    Sorry if this has been asked before.. I only skimmed through the comments. Just a question regarding terminology. When you say “2 km both ways” do you mean 2 km is the distance for the whole roundtrip journey (there and back), or do you mean 2km one way and 2km back again? To most people it wouldnt matter, but trying to find walks to do with my 5 year old daughter.. She only has so much stamina. We are in tromso right now and looking for things to do

    Reply
    • Hi Jack,

      So sorry for my bad English when describing the distance. Yes, I mean 2 km in distance for the round trip (there and back), so approximately 1 km in distance each way.

      Hillesøytoppen is, however, a bit steep. It is basically 2 km of steep uphill all the way, almost climbing in some parts (there is a rope to grab on to). So maybe that is too steep for a 5-year-old? You will probably have to carry her on your back some places of the path.

      Then I think Ørnfløya is better, it is also 2 km in distance round trip. A little bit uphill but not steep at all. I think Ørnfløya would be perfect for a 5-year-old, I have met many kids on my hikes to this small hill.

      Nattmålsfjellet would also be OK I think, even though it is longer (4 km roundtrip in distance). It is not steep at all and part of the route is flat so it is easy to walk. It is also nice to take breaks along this path.

      The top Trehørningen might also be a good match. It is actually marked as a “TURBO trekking path“, where TURBO is the children’s Norwegian Trekking Association (in short DNT). But it is longer, 3 km in distance round trip and a bit uphill in the beginning.

      Hope this helped a little. Have an awesome hike with your 5-year-old! 🙂 I am heading back home to Tromsø in a week to do some hiking, so hope to update this article with more short hiking trips that are also suitable for children.

      Cheers from Bangkok,
      Maria

      Reply
  45. Great article. Helps a lot considering I’m heading to Trømso for 8 days in early/mid-September. Do you know much about camping in the area?

    Reply
    • Hi Ollie,

      Thank you so much! You can camp with a tent anywhere you want in Norway, except for on private grounds/ gardens, but none of these are private grounds so you can camp on all of these mountains.

      As for camping close to Tromso city, there is a great camping called Tromso Lodge & Camping where you can set up a tent or hire a cabin. It is located on Tromsdalen, the mainland of Tromso, about a 10-min drive or a 40 min walk from downtown of Tromso. There are also buses going from Tromsdalen to downtown. At Tromso Lodge & Camping you get access to a kitchen, showers, toilets and so on.

      Have a great trip to Tromso in September!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  46. Hi Maria,

    Thank you so much for detailed information . My fiancée and I are traveling from Canada to Tromso end of September. We have a stopover in Reykjavik for 7 hours and hoping to see some of the Reykjanes peninsula while there. In Tromso we are staying in Amalie hotel ,going to hike some of these trails and experience Vulkana boat ! We have been checking the area on satellite maps for elevations where to possibly head for a hike and spend a night over the open sky as long as it doesn’t rain , your information was needed to plan better! Also dress code is well noted for the adventure – layers !

    Reply
    • Hi Mari,

      Thank you so much, so happy to hear that our article about hikes in Tromso could be of help and inspiration to you when planning your Tromso-trip. Amalie is a nice hotel! It has a very central and convenient location and is a rather small hotel. Enjoy their delicious waffles! 🙂

      Wow, great to hear that you plan on going on a trip with Vulkana, that boat is so cool! The temperature in the sea is pretty cold in September, though, if you plan on going for a swim. 😉

      September can be pretty rainy and cold, especially at night. What about tenting? All of these mountains are great for tenting where you will wake up with the most spectacular view for breakfast :). Also, the Northern Lights is even more spectacular at these mountains as there will be no disturbing artificial lightning like in the city.

      Tromso Outdoor rent out all the camping gear that you will need to go tenting, and is located close to your hotel. You should pop by their renting supply store when you get to Tromso and check out what they have of gear. And yeah, bring lots of warm and wind-and-waterproof clothes. 🙂 We sometimes have snow at the end of September.

      Have a great trip to Tromso in September! And enjoy the hiking! Crossing my fingers that you will see plenty of green and pink Northern Lights dancing in the sky! 🙂

      -Maria-

      Reply
  47. Hi,

    Great info! I’m planning a 10 day trip for the end of January. I’m looking for a more challenging hike. We are both in our late 20’s and like some adventure. Any recommendations? We never did any trails in the snow so I guess a maximum of a 4 hours (2,5 to and 1,5 back).
    Hope you have some suggestions. Again great info!

    Reply
    • Hi Hans,

      Thank you so much! Great to hear that you are heading to Tromso at the end of January!

      The sun will be back on the 21st of January, but it will only be up for a few minutes each day. The daylight is short so bring headlamps if you want to do longer hikes.

      Also, there will be snow in Tromso in January, so you should rent some snowshoes or skis (at for instance Tromso Outdoor). For these 7 hikes mentioned in this article, you should add at least an hour (depending on your shape) due to the snow.

      Kjølen
      Another good option that is a longer hike is the mountain Kjolen (790 meters above sea level). The hike will take about 4-5 hours round-trip in the snow. Drive to Finnvikdalen towards Skulsfjord, and park by the tunnel (there is a big parking spot before you enter the tunnel). From there you just follow the tracks. On top of the mountain Kjolen there is a huge white round antenna so it is easy to see the top on your way up.

      Tromsdalstinden
      A more extreme hike is the mountain Tromsdalstinden (1238 meters above sea level). Take the cable car up to Floya mountain, and walk from there (on the right edge of Tromsdalstinden). But this is a long hike, and will probably take 7-8 hours round-trip depending on the snow conditions and your shape.

      Lille Blåmann
      The mountain Lille Blaamann (844 meters above sea level) is also a nice option. Drive to the parking slot in Håkøybotn, and walk from there. This hike will probably take around 4 hours.

      Bring warm clothes, good shoes, something warm to drink and something to eat as it is freezing cold in Tromso in January (around -10 C) and hardly any sun.

      If you like outdoor adventures, you should try dog sledding, it is great fun and an awesome way to see the nature around Tromso.

      Have a great trip and hikes in Tromso in January! Crossing my fingers that you will see plenty of Northern Lights! 🙂

      -Maria-

      Reply
  48. Hi Maria,
    firstly, thank you so much for this article and the website! You provide a lot of helpful and interesting information. And the pictures are stunning!

    I’m heading to Tromso for a two-day conference on October 17th and I am adding one day for exploring and hiking. I’ve decided to walk up Floya (again, thank you for all the info and the maps). I think you already answered some of my questions in your reply to Stuti, but I’d like to double check few things.
    Concerning weather, should I expect rain (and possibly snow) in mid-October? I’m guessing waterproofed hiking boots would be appropriate for this trek? I’m planning to bring my two-layer skiing jacket. Does it sound adequate for the likely weather this time of year?

    Thanks again, Lucie

    Reply
    • Hi Lucie,

      Thank you so much! Floya is a great hike! You can either take the long and more flat way up (to the right when you start from the cable car ticket office), or you can walk up the newly finished “Sherpa stairs” (to the left of the cable car) which is a really nice stone staircase, but a bit steeper than the one to the right of the cable car.

      In mid-October, we don´t usually have snow, or at least very little, but some rain so waterproofed hiking boots are perfect. October is the month with most rain in Tromso. The average temperature in Tromso in October is +3 C degrees, but it can also be minus degrees (the record low is -9,6 C and the record high is +18,6 C for October).

      A two-layer skiing jacket sounds great! You should also bring a wool sweater or fleece sweater/ jacket in your backpack to put on under your jacket once you reach the top. And bring a dry shirt so you can change your sweatshirt once you get to the top (there are toilets at the restaurant at the top).

      Crossing my fingers that you will see plenty of Northern Lights and have no rain!! 🙂

      Have a great trip to Tromso in October, and enjoy your hike to Floya!

      -Maria-

      Reply
      • Hi Maria,

        Thank you very much for your response and advice! I wouldn’t have thought of bringing an extra dry shirt to change on the top! But it makes sense. Weather permitting, I want to take the loner and flatter route up and the stairs (or the cable car) down.

        And yes, I am also hoping to see some Northern lights. I’m looking at organized evening trips from Tromso to see them. Again, thank you for providing all the information and links on your website! It is truly very helpful. So, fingers crossed the sky will be clear as I’ll have only one night to try. 

        Again thank you and happy wandering the world!
        Lucie

        Reply
  49. Wow! Thank you so much for such a well detailed guide, very thoughtful of you to consider those of us unfamiliar with the area.

    Visited Tromso back in 2014 with my wife hoping to do some hiking in the area but it was a bit too windy and cold for her. Record low temperature in the city she grew up in was 16 C, even in September there in Tromso it was a challenge just getting her out of the car.

    Now I’m returning (alone) in November and was looking for something in upper Norway to hike. Seems like Reinebringen is closed due to deterioration so I found your post. Not afraid of the cold/rain/wind/snow but hopefully I can get a bit of clear skies for the view.

    Thanks Again!

    Elliott

    Reply
    • Hi Elliott,

      Thank you so much! Great to hear that you are coming back to Northern Norway in November to do some hiking!

      Yeah, I heard that Reinebrigen in the Lofoten Islands is closed as they are building “Sherpa” stairs made of rocks so that the path gets easier to hike. Tromso is an excellent alternative to Lofoten! We have some brilliant hikes here as well, and the mountains are very close to the Tromso airport and the city so it’s very convenient and easy to go hiking here.

      I am in Tromso right now visiting my parents, and it has been snowing like crazy here the last couple of days, so the winter has come. Although the snow might probably melt again. But if there is plenty of snow in Tromso when you are visiting, you can always rent snowshoes and poles/ hiking sticks at Tromso Outdoor (they have a rental shop downtown).

      Bring a headlamp (the sun goes below the horizon on the 27th of November and will not return until the 21st of January), warm, wind and waterproof clothes, and steady hiking boots and you will have some perfect hikes up here in the Arctic. The average temperature in Tromso is -2 in November, so it is not that cold.

      Crossing my fingers that you will get nice weather and clear sky, and see plenty of natures firework show – the Northern Lights! 🙂 Have some great hiking trips!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  50. This blog is absolutely gorgeous!! I am coming to Tromso in December, are any of the tracks open in December? And any tips for seeing the northern lights at this time?

    Thankyou kindly,

    Imogen

    Reply
    • Hi Imogen,

      Thank you so much!! All of these hiking tracks are open in December, they never close. But there might be snow in Tromso in December (there is no snow right now, only lots of rain), then you might want to rent some snowshoes. You can rent snowshoes and other equipment at Tromso Outdoor which is located in downtown of Tromso. There is also no sun in Tromso in December (the sun is below the horizon until 21st of January) so bring a headlamp and head out early.

      As for seeing the Northern Lights, you should constantly check the weather forecast and cross your fingers for a clear sky. Then you will be able to see the Northern Lights even from the city, but you will see it stronger if you head out of the city a little bit where there are fewer street lights. You should also consider joining a Northern Lights tour as they will drive you around the area outside of Tromso, all through the night and really try everything to find some Northern Lights.

      Have a fantastic time in Tromso in December! Hope you get to see plenty of dancing Northern Lights across the sky.

      -Maria-

      Reply
  51. Hi Maria!

    Thank you for this wonderful blog post for some easy hikes in Tromso! I will be visiting for the first time this upcoming March around spring equinox time! I’m hoping for some wonderful views, great weather, and be able to spot the aurora borealis while there, as well as some other adventures such as dog sledding! Any tips for hiking around that time? I plan on Brosmetinden, seeing Sommaroy, Nattmalsfjellet, and of course Floya!

    Linh

    Reply
    • Hi Linh,

      Thank you so much! Sounds like you will have a fantastic trip to Tromso in March!

      We have an unusual amount of snow here in Tromso right now. The official snow depth according to the Norweigan Weather Forecast Association is 114 cm right now which is a lot for January! Normally March is the big snow month in Tromso, so it might be plenty of snow here when you are visiting if it keeps snowing. You might want to rent snowshoes at Tromso Outdoor as it is impossible to walk on the mountains with normal shoes with this amount of snow.

      I recommend that you rent a car, especially Brosmetinden and Nattmålsfjellet are difficult to get to by bus. You should also visit Ersfjorden and the cozy cafe Bryggejentene. I love that place! Ersfjorden is a great place to see the Northern Lights. If you don´t want to rent a car, however, you can take the bus to Ersfjorden and walk up to Nattmålsfjellet from that side of the mountain and not the side that I have written about in this article.

      Floya is a great mountain to visit the whole year round, either by walking up to the top or taking the cable car.

      Have a great trip to Tromso in March!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  52. This is perhaps the best blog I have read on hiking in Tromsø and I feel I have been obsessed researching this. Your description and pictures majorly helped us with our first week of September trip. Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Hi Laurel,

      Thank you soooo much for your awesome comment and words about our blog! You are the best! 🙂

      Hehe, I can totally get that you are feeling obsessed by researching mountain trips in Tromsø as there are so many mountains here! It can be difficult to choose which one to hike if you have never been here. So happy to hear that my list of favorite mountains helped you plan your trip to Tromsø in September.

      Have a fantastic trip to Tromsø in September, and enjoy the hiking! Crossing my fingers that you will have nice weather!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  53. Hi Maria. Is it possible to a snowshoe hike to Rodtind in during late March? I don’t have any experience with snowshoeing. I’m planning to do it by myself. Is it safe & feasible to do so?

    Reply
    • Hi Bilal,

      Yes, it is possible to do a snowshoeing hike to Rødtind in late March. It is a lovely hike and I`m sure you will love it!

      Rodtind is a very popular mountain for skiing and snowboarding. I would say that Rødtind is THE most popular skiing mountain in Tromso. There are people skiing, snowboarding, and snowshoeing Rødtind 24/7, day and night. Our house is right beneath Rodtind so I see the mountain very clearly from our kitchen windows and there are constantly people at this mountain. 🙂 So there is always a skiing track/ path up to the top of the mountain that you walk along with snowshoes. By following the ski track to the top, it will be easier for you to walk as the snow is not that fluffy in the tracks.

      We have a lot of snow here in Tromso right now, it has been snowing like crazy for the last couple of days! It might even be a snow record in Tromso this year. So you should definitely rent some snowshoes and maybe some poles as well. The poles will make it easier to walk in the snow and help you keep your balance. You can rent all the hiking equipment you need, including snowshoes and poles, at Tromso Outdoor in the downtown of Tromso.

      I have only tried walking with snowshoes once, and it was very easy and you quickly get a hang on it.

      Yes, Rødtind is safe and feasible to do by yourself. You just follow the ski tracks and you will be fine. You also see Tromso city all the way to the top of Rodtind so you will not get lost. There are constantly people at this mountain so you will probably not be alone and meet other people along the way. March is the perfect time to go snowshoeing in Tromso, and my favorite skiing month, as the sun is really starting to warm and is up all day so you get plenty of daylight. So March is a nice month to spend time outside.

      Have a fantastic trip to Tromso in late March and enjoy your snowshoeing hike to Rødtind!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  54. Hello Maria!

    First of all, thanks for sharing with so many details all these incredible places!!! =)

    In two weeks, my husband, his mother and I are going to Tromso, and we are very looking forward to see the Northern Lights and to do some of these hikes you have talked about.. For the Northern Lights, we are going to book a guided tour, to have more chances to see it, and for the hikes we are thinking about renting a car, as you suggested. The thing is that we have no experience driving in snowy roads, and according to the forecast it is supposed to snow for the entire week before we arrive. Could you tell us if the main roads there are going to be clear? Or is it better to take buses there?

    Also, do you have any other advice for us to hike in this time of the year?

    Thank you in advance!! =)

    Flavia

    Reply
    • Hi Flavia,

      Thank you so much! Happy to hear that you like the article of my favorite easy hikes in Tromso! 🙂

      Yeah, we have a LOT of snow here in Tromso at the moment. It has been snowing like crazy so it seems like we are heading towards a new snow record in Tromso this year. But the roads are constantly cleared of snow so it is perfectly fine and safe to drive a car. The bus service is very limited in Tromso, especially if you want to get a bit outside of the city and do these hikes. There are some buses to Kvaloya and the outer areas of Tromso, but they are very few, and if you take the bus out in the morning there might not be one to take you back to the city in the afternoon.

      I recommend that you rent a car. With a car, you will be more flexible and it is more convenient and comfortable to get around. It is easy to drive here in Tromso as there is not much traffic. So just drive slow if the roads are icy and you will be fine. The rental cars also have winter tires with spikes so it is perfectly safe to drive during winter.

      You might want to rent some snowshoes and poles, it depends on which of these mountains you want to hike. The mountains on the outer side of Kvaloya (Ørnfløya and Hillesøytoppen) should be ok to hike without snowshoes, but the other ones have plenty of fluffy snow so it will be difficult to hike these with normal shoes.

      Have an awesome trip to Tromso and enjoy your hiking!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  55. Hello Maria,

    your post is sooooo helpfull! Amazing, after reading almost everything is ready with my itenerary. I have one question – maybe you can help – we are coming to Tromso on 28th February staying until March 4th. Do you think we can get to Brensholmen or Hillesoytopen by car in this period? Or the roads will be dangerous, frozen with snow? we wil lrent 4×4 car 🙂

    thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Anna,

      Thank you so much!! So happy to hear that our blog could be of help to you when planning your Tromso trip! 🙂

      Yes, you will be able to get to Brensholmen, Sommaroy, and Hillesoy by car in February/ March. The roads are constantly cleared of snow so it is perfectly safe to drive.

      There are a lot of people living on Brensholmen, Sommaroy, and Hillesoy that work in Tromso city and they drive to the city every morning and back home every afternoon. So the roads are always open, unless if there has been an avalanche at Kattfjordeidet, then this part of the road will be closed (it has only happened a few times). Then you can take the other road, the one on the outside of Kvaloya – see the two road options here on Google Maps. The road by the seaside of Kvaloya is a bit longer but very beautiful, maybe more scenic than the one through Kattfjord as you get the sea and fjord view all the way. We typically take one road option on our way out to Hillesoy (most often the inner one through Kattfjord as it is shorter), and the other one back home to Tromso city (the outer one along the sea).

      We do, however, have an extreme and unusual amount of snow here in Tromso right now, but all the roads have been cleared and are open. It has been snowing like crazy for the last couple of days. You can check the weather forecast for Tromso here (or download the free app Yr), and see a live camera and weather update of Tromso here.

      Have an awesome trip to Tromso in February/ March, and enjoy your drive and hiking out to Hillesoy and Brensholmen! Crossing my fingers that you will get a clear sky and see plenty of Northern Lights!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  56. Thank you very much for this blog! I have recently visited Tromso, rent a car and did all of these hikes and it was simply beautiful. My favourite hike was #7 Trehørningen, where witnessed amazing sunset with pink and blue colours. It was the second most stunning view – just after Grand Canyon – for me and will never forget it!

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Michal,

      Thank you so much! Awesome to hear that you did ALL of these hikes! Wow, I`m impressed! 🙂

      Trehørningen is a great little hike with a stunning view. So happy to hear that you got to see a beautiful sunset from the top of Trehørningen.

      Thanks a million for commenting! I love to hear from our readers who got inspired to do these hikes! Really appreciate it! 🙂

      All the best,
      Maria

      Reply
  57. My husband and I would like to visit Lofoten the first week of May. We wish to go hiking, is it possible? Is there still a lot of snow at this time?

    Reply
    • Hi,

      May is perfect for hiking in Lofoten. There is no snow in Lofoten in May.

      Have a great trip to Lofoten!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  58. Hello Maria.

    I absolutely love this blog. We are coming to Tromso in 1 week (mid-April)! We are renting a campervan and plan on seeing as much as possible of the north in 8 days.
    I like seeing the responses on all the snow this year. Do you think we would still need some snowshoes to do many of these hikes? We would also like to try some hiking in the Lyngen Alps during this time. Any recommendations for this?
    Thanks again for the brilliant blog! It is truly inspiring.

    Reply
    • Hi David,

      Thanks a million for your nice words about our blog! Really appreciate it! You are the best! 🙂

      So cool that you are renting a campervan in Tromso and will be driving around for eight days! It is the best way to see Tromso and its surrounding areas.

      It is snowing like craaaaaazy in Tromso at the moment! It´s been snowing 50 cm just the last couple of days. It is officially 136 cm of snow in Tromso at the moment (the meteorology station at the top of Tromso Island). But there is even more snow in other places in Tromso due to the wind. My parents have actually gone south to Oslo to my brother to escape all the snow, as they could not cope with it, hehe. 🙂 It looks like there might be a new snow record in Tromso this year. The old one is from 29th of April 1997 when it was 240 cm of snow.

      Yep, you will definitely need snowshoes if you are doing any of these hikes. You can rent snowshoes and poles at Tromso Outdoor. There will probably be good skiing conditions in the mountains in Tromso and Lyngen until mid-June this year.

      You can check the Yr webpage/ App to see the weather forecast for Tromso and Lyngen.

      There is extremely high avalanche danger (red zone) in Tromso and Lyngen Alps at the moment due to the huge amount of heavy snow. One man sadly died yesterday in an avalanche just outside of Tromso. Earlier today a German tourist got taken by an avalanche in the Lyngen Alps, at the mountain Fastdalstinden, while he was hiking with two friends. He luckily survived as his friends managed to dig him out.

      You can find the avalanche conditions and warnings at the webpage Varsom. So be careful and don´t walk in mountainsides that are steeper than 30 degrees (angle). But none of the mountains in my post is that steep, so you should be fine if you stick to these hikes.

      For the Lyngen Alps, however, I recommend that you go with a guide and book a snowshoeing tour.

      Have a fantastic trip to Tromso and enjoy the hiking! Crossing my fingers that the snowing will stop so that you get nice weather and get a chance of seeing the Northern Lights.

      Cheers from sunny, warm, and snow-free Thailand! 🙂

      -Maria-

      Reply
  59. Thanks for your Posting. My family is going to spend our summer holidays this year in northern Norway. Your post really helps. We decide to take the trail Hillesoytoppen, however, there’s still something confusing us.
    Is it a loop trail? And as we get to the top of it, we don’t need to take the same way back to the Hillesory Youth Center, do we? And then go the other way down to the beach? And then turn left back to the Hillesoy Youth Center? Is it easy to find the way back? Does this take a longer time or?
    Your reply will be appreciated very much.

    Reply
    • Hi JJ,

      Awesome that you are spending your summer holiday in Northern Norway!! Yay! 🙂 You will love it! Crossing my fingers that you will get good weather.

      Yes, it is a loop trail at Hillesoytoppen. You don´t have to take the same way back down. But you can take the same way down if you want, it is up to you.

      The way up is a bit steep so it is better for your knees to do the other way (the loop trail) down, and also nicer as you will see another part of the mountain. To do the loop trail, you go to the left once you reach the top. You will easily see the path, and you just follow the path all the way down to a beach and some houses.

      Once you get down to the beach (to the left of the mountain), you then turn left and follow the road (normal paved car road) back to the Hillesoy Youth Center where you have parked your car. You can use Google Maps or another map to see the road to follow.

      The loop trail takes a little more time than taking the steep way down (the one you came up), but not that much. It also depends on how quickly you go down the steep way at is can be a bit scary on the way down. I recommend taking the loop trail.

      You should also do the hike to Ørnfløya. It is on the mainland, just before you cross the bridge to Sommaroy. It is also a very nice and easy hike with a fantastic view of Sommaroy, Hillesoy, and Hillesoytoppen. You can easily do both hikes in one day.

      Have a great trip to Northern Norway this summer!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  60. Hello Maria
    Plase would really appreciate if you can tell me are this trails doable in early March and is the trail well marked even that there will be snow?or the snow covers the marks.
    Ps:I LOVE YOUR PHOTOS!!cant wait to make my own????

    Reply
    • Hi Agli,

      Thank you so much! ❤️

      There will most likely be plenty of snow in Tromso in early March. March is the month of the year with the most snow in Tromso, but yes you can still do these hikes.

      I recommend that you hire snowshoes and maybe poles at the Tromso Outdoor (they are located in downtown Tromso).

      These hikes are very popular also in the wintertime, so you will easily see tracks of skis, snowboards, and snowshoes going up these mountains. Just follow the tracks (ski/ snowshoes) of other hikers and you will be fine.

      You should check the weather forecast before heading out on these hikes, and of course, don’t head out if the forecast says that there will be a snowstorm. YR is the best place to check the weather forecast in Tromso. They have an app (it is called YR) and a webpage.

      Bring a backpack with dry, warm clothes, something warm to drink like coffee, tea or hot chocolate on a thermos, biscuits or chocolates (us Norwegian always bring a Norwegian chocolate called “Kvikk Lunsj” with us when we go hiking, it is delicious! ????), and something to eat, and you will have a great winter hike in the snow in March.

      Have a great trip to Tromso in March! Crossing all my fingers and toes that you will see plenty of Northern Lights! Saw some spectacular Northern Lights here in Tromso this weekend, by the way, while we were camping up in the mountains. Even though there was a full moon lighting up the landscape, the northern lights were super strong and kept dancing like crazy across the sky all night. Stunning!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  61. Hi Maria,

    Thank you for sharing these awesome hiking spots. I hiked Rødtind last weekend with my friends from the uni. It was thrilling when it was snowing halfway and the view was stunning on the top. When I was resting on the top, I saw a woman with a dog. I didn’t see them closely, but maybe they were you and Lara 🙂

    Reply
    • Hi Melody,

      Thank you so much for this awesome comment! Wow, can’t believe that you hiked Rødtind last weekend with the snow and everything! Sounds like you had a fantastic hike!

      Hehe, yeah it could have been me and Lara. ???? We are back home in Tromso right now and are living just below Rødtind. But I’m afraid it was not us you met on Rødtind last weekend as we were hiking in the northern part of Troms county where we have a cabin.

      All the best and have a great semester at UiT!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  62. Thank you so very much, for such detailed information. You are a star! Visiting Tromso in the last week of October & all this is beyond helpful. Thank you!!

    Reply
    • Thank you soooooo much, Shirzad!! ❤️???? Awesome that you are going to Tromso in just a couple of weeks! Yay!

      The Northern Lights have been spectacular here in Tromso lately. Especially last night was amazing! We were out walking with our dog and the sky was on fire in red, purple, blue, yellow, and green for several hours! Crossing my fingers that the Northern Lights will be this intense and bright when you are visiting too!!

      Have a fantastic trip to Tromso!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  63. Hi Maria,
    I will travel to Tromso around end of Feb 2020, Please would really appreciate if you can tell me is it possible for hiking and the time of sun set. many thanks

    Reply
    • Hi Andy,

      It is plenty of snow in Tromso in February. In fact, we have lots and lots of snow here in Tromso already which is a bit unusual. Winter came early this year.

      You can go hiking at the end of February, but I recommend that you use snowshoes or skis. You can rent winter equipment at Tromso Outdoor (located in downtown Tromso).

      At the end of February, the sun sets around 18:30 (6:30 pm) in the evenings.

      Have a fantastic trip to Tromso in February! Crossing my fingers that you will see plenty of Northern Lights!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  64. Hi, was planning a trip to tromso around late march to early April, may I know are this hike doable during that period?

    Reply
    • Hi Koh Han Pin,

      There will most likely be lots of snow in Tromso in late March/ beginning of April. So if you want to do these hikes, you should consider renting snowshoes at Tromso Outdoor: https://www.tromsooutdoor.no/rentals. Or you can rent skis.

      Mountain number 6 in this list, Hillesøytoppen, has hardly any snow, however. Since it is located far out close to the sea, the snow gets blown off by the strong wind. So Hillesøytoppen should be ok to hike with normal hiking shoes (no need for snowshoes).

      The Easter Holiday is at the beginning of April next year. So everything (shops and many restaurants and cafes) will be closed on the 5. and 9.- 13. April.

      Have a great trip to Tromso in March/ April!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  65. Hi Maria, What period of photos were taken? I am thinking of arriving on February 25 and I wonder if snow can be problematic in passing this route.

    Reply
    • Hi Karol,

      These photos were taken during summer and autumn (June, July, August, September, October).

      There will most likely be lots of snow in Tromso in late February. So if you want to do these hikes, you should consider renting snowshoes at Tromso Outdoor: https://www.tromsooutdoor.no/rentals. Or you can rent skis.

      Mountain number 6 in this list, Hillesøytoppen, has hardly any snow, however. Since it is located far out close to the sea, the snow gets blown off by the strong wind. So Hillesøytoppen should be ok to hike with normal hiking shoes (no need for snowshoes).

      Have a great trip to Tromso at the end of February!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  66. We did no 3 – Rotind – today in deep snow (normal snow boots) and it was fantastic. Thanks for the tips. We’ll take the memories back to London!

    Reply
    • Hi Amy,

      Wow, that is awesome! I’m impressed that you went hiking with normal snow boots in the deep snow! It must have been a good workout. 🙂

      So Tromso has lots of snow – that is great news as we are flying back home from Tokyo tomorrow. Can’t wait to go skiing on Rodtind with my dog! 🙂

      Thank you so much for commenting!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  67. Hi Maria
    what a great traval blog you put together. For all my adventure around Tromso I got the information out of your blog. (You should once put togehter such a great blog from my region Wallis CH 😉 ) I will arrive on the 26th of January stay for one week and bring my crossblades (https://www.crossblades.ch/de) with me. I will check them out on the hills around Tromsö. I will plan to go up to the FLØYA AND RODTIND. Now I’m looking forward to check out the Norway nature and have a nice descent. Is there a other hill close to the town where I can skin up? Where can I check out the avalanche report?

    Thanks so much and greetings from the Swiss Alps – Fabian

    Reply
    • Hi Fabian,

      Thank you so much!! We have unfortunately not been to the Swiss Alps yet, but it is on our list. I would love to go Telemark skiing in the Swiss Alps, it looks beautiful!

      So cool that you will try out Crossblades in Tromso. I have never tried or seen Crossblades. They look like great fun to ski on, although a bit difficult as they are so short, especially if the snow is deep?

      As for mountains close to Tromso city (that you can easily get to by bus), I recommend these:

      – Rødtind (on Kvaloya, take bus no. 42 to Storelva Snuplass)
      – Finnlandsfjellet (just next to Rødtind, also bus no. 42)
      – Kjølen (you can walk to Kjølen from Finnlandsfjellet or Rødtind)
      – Fløya (take the cable car up, and you have several mountains/ hills in the area)
      – Tromsdalstinden (walk along the valley Tromsdalen, you don’t have to walk all the way up to Tromsdalstinden as it is pretty far)
      Tromsø Alpinpark (the only alpine center in Tromso with ski lifts)

      I have marked these mountains in this Google Map.

      You should check the avalanche danger on the webpage or app Varsom.no and the weather forecast on the webpage or app Yr.no.

      Have a fantastic trip to Tromso at the end of January! It is raining a lot here today, plus lots of wind, so the skiing conditions are unfortunately really bad here in Tromso right now.

      -Maria-

      Reply
  68. Hello ,
    I’m visiting Tromso end of Jan and I would like to do one of the hikes beside the one with the cable car in Tromso. Which one would you recommend most?
    And if you could arrange them in order of best views.
    Thanks

    Reply
    • Hi Mohamed,

      These seven mountains are arranged in order of best views, with Brosmetinden as the best view and my favorite hike. 🙂

      But it depends on whether or not you are planning on renting a car. If you will not rent a car, then Fløya (where there is a cable car) and Rødtind are your best options. You can easily get to Rødtind by bus no. 42 (get off at the bus stop Storelv and you will see the mountain from the bus stop) or taxi. Fløya is very close to the downtown of Tromso so you can easily walk to the cable car (over the bridge) or take the bus or a taxi.

      You can also hike Nattmålstinden without a car, but from the other side than I describe in this article. You can hike Nattmålstinden from Ersfjord (take bus no. 425 from downtown of Tromso and get off at the bus stop Ersfjordbotn).

      With a rental car, however, you can easily get to all of these mountains. Brosmetinden is my favorite mountain with little snow so it is easy to hike also during wintertime. Ørnfløya is also very nice with excellent views of the sea and small islands like Sommarøy. Ørnfløya also has little snow so it is easy to hike in January.

      Just be aware that it is pretty dark in Tromso at the end of January. The sun returns on the 21st of January, but it is only up for a few minutes each day, so bring a headlamp. We also have a lot of snow here in Tromso right now (mid-January), so you should probably rent snowshoes and poles to make the hike a bit easier. 🙂

      You can check the weather forecast and snow conditions in Tromso at Yr.no (or download the Yr app). You can see how the weather is like right now in Tromso at the live camera stream: http://weather.cs.uit.no/

      Have a great trip to Tromso at the end of January and enjoy your hiking!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  69. Hello ,
    Thanks for the comprehensive guide. I was booking a guided hike on Kvaloya with Tromso outdoor. I learnt that they go to Tverrfjellet, which I don’t see on your list here.
    So I was wondering how do you rate this hike in terms of views of the Fjords and the whole scenery compared to the places mentioned here on your list?
    The other option they have, is what they call the easy hike to Nattmålsfjellet, which doesn’t necessarily go to the top of the hill as it depends on the overall fitness of the group and the weather conditions.
    Thanks to advise
    Mohamed El Nomrossy

    Reply
    • Hi Mohamed,

      Thank you so much!

      Tverrfjellet is also a great hike that is quite easy. Tverrfjellet is actually located close to Nattmålsfjellet (just a bit further in on Kattfjordeiedet) so they are in the same mountain range.

      From the top of Tverrfjellet, you have a fantastic view of Kattfjord and all the mountain peaks that surround Kattfjordeidet. To add Tverrfjellet is actually on my list of changes to do to this article. So it will be added to this list one day. 🙂 Tverrfjellet is, however, very popular both summer and winter (it is great for skiing as well), so the parking lot is often full especially when the weather is nice.

      Nattmålsfjellet is an easier hike than Tverrfjellet, with just a little bit uphill some parts, while Tverrfjellet is basically uphill all the way to the top. So it depends on your level of fitness.

      If you don’t go to the top of Nattmålsfjellet, you will not have that nice of a view as you will not see Ersfjord. So if your level of fitness is ok, I would choose Tverrfjellet if I were you, especially if there is a chance that you will not reach the top of Nattmålsfjellet on the other tour.

      Have a fantastic time in Tromso and enjoy your snowshoeing hike on Kattfjordeidet!

      All the best,
      Maria

      Reply
  70. Hi Maria,

    First of all – great blog! A lot of very useful information and beautiful photos 🙂 Myself and 5 friends are flying to Tromso in the middle of the March with the aim to see northern lights (hopefully we are lucky). However we also love mountains and hiking so we would like to hike some mountains during our stay in Norway. We won’t be staying in Tromso itself but in Lyngseidet which around 100km away. I see that the hikes described in this post are more on the other side of Tromso than we will be so I was wondering if you know some interesting trails in the area of Lyngseidet?

    Thanks in advance for any advice 🙂

    Iwona

    Reply
    • Hi Iwona,

      Thank you so much for your great words about our blog! Really appreciate it!

      Yes, these hikes are all in Tromso. You will be staying in Lyngseidet, which is about 2-3 hours drive from Tromso (and also includes a ferry).

      I am not that familiar with the area around Lyngseidet, as I live in Tromso and mostly ski and hike in the Tromso area.

      Here are a few nice and popular hiking options/ mountains close to Lyngseidet:

      Rørnesfjellet (1041 meters high)
      A 4-6 hours hike. The most popular mountain in Lyngseidet for hiking, both summer and winter. A very nice skiing/ snowboarding mountain, as well as with snowshoes. Awesome views of Lyngenfjord and Kjosen.
      Read more about Rørnesfjellet here and here (sorry, this page is only in Norwegian).

      Kavringtinden (1289 meters high), also called Goalsevarri in Sami language
      A 5-hour hike, close to Lyngseidet (just straight up from Lyngseidet). Fantastic mountain for skiing and snowboarding.
      Read more about Kavringtinden and see photos here (sorry, this page is only in Norwegian)

      Russelvfjellet (794 meters high)
      A 4-hour hike, amazing views of the sea and fjords. Great for skiing/ snowboarding. It is not located at Lyngseidet, so you will have to drive further out in Lyngen, to Russelvneset where you start hiking.
      Read more about Russelvfjellet and see photos here (sorry, it is only in Norwegian)

      I have marked these three mountains in this Google Map so you can see where they are located.

      But be aware of avalanches! Every year people die from avalanches in Lyngen. In 2018 a woman from Austria sadly died at Russelvfjellet and in 2017 two people died from avalanche at Kavringtiden.

      Always check the weather forecast at Yr.no and the avalanche level at Varsom.no (or download the free apps) before heading out on hiking trips during winter. And ask the locals if it is safe to hike.

      Wear proper winter clothes and equipment (snowshoes and poles, or skis/snowboard), bring food and something hot to drink. Avalanche equipment like a probe, searcher and a shovel is also a good idea to bring in your backpack. You can rent all these things at Tromso Outdoor located in downtown of Tromso.

      Have a fantastic trip to Lyngen in March! Crossing my fingers that you will see plenty of Northern Lights! Enjoy the hikes!

      -Maria-

      Reply
      • Hi Maria,

        Thank you so much for your answer and suggestions! Of course we will be very careful if it comes to hiking in mountains. We actually live in Poland close to Tatry mountains (the highest mountains in Poland), we hike them regularly (also in winter and they are over 2000 meters high) so we are quite familiar with all the equipment. But we will be extra cautious in Norway as this is completely new area for us.

        Thank you again for replying 🙂
        Iwona

        Reply
    • Hi Moritz,

      Thank you so much! Yes, you need snowshoes if you want to do some hiking in Tromso in January. We have a lot of snow here in Tromso right now (end of January), it has been snowing like crazy! We have more snow than normal for January.

      -Maria-

      Reply
    • Hi Bching,

      Yes, it is possible to hike Ørnfløya in late March. It is a small mountain, only 150 m high, located out at sea. There is usually not so much snow at this mountain as the wind blows it off into the sea. So you should be fine hiking Ørnfløya in regular winter boots.

      Ørnfløya is a very easy hike so you will have no problem doing it without any previous hiking experience. The views are spectacular!

      I assume that you are planning on renting a car? Ørnfløya is located about a 1-hour drive from Tromso, next to the small island Sommarøy. You can see the driving route to Ørnfløya here (Google Maps).

      It is still winter here in Tromso in March, with snow and cold weather. So bring warm clothes, something to eat/ snacks, and hot drinks (coffee, tea or hot chocolate on a thermos) when hiking in March. Check the weather forecast at YR.no before heading out on your hike.

      Have a great trip to Tromso in late March and enjoy your hike to Ørnfløya!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  71. Do you think it’s possible to explore Senja and Kvaloya by ourselves or do we need guides?
    Are there marked trails for hiking in both areas?
    Were is the best place to photograph wildlife and what would I expect to see i.e. birds, animals? Thank you for your response.

    Reply
    • Hi Lawrence,

      Yes, you can easily explore Senja and Kvaloya by yourself in your own car or a rental car. It will be no problem exploring these two islands on your own as there are very few roads so you just follow the road that goes around the islands.

      For the most popular hikes, you just have to find the start of the mountain/ trail (parking spot), as there is a clear path leading up the mountain. So you just follow the path, often they are also marked with signs.

      I recommend that you drive from Tromso to Kvaloya, and to a place on Kvaloya called Brensholmen. There is a ferry from Brensholmen to Botnhamn on Senja (only in summertime). The ferry trip is very scenic.

      The Polar Park

      If you want to photograph wildlife up close, your best shot is the Polar Park outside of Tromso (in Bardu). They have all the big arctic animals like wolves, lynx, bears, wolverine, and muskox. It is the only place where you get to photograph these kinds of animals up close as they are very shy in the wild and you will very rarely see them on hiking trips.

      You will, however, see reindeer and moose while hiking on Kvaloya and probably on Senja as well. The reindeer are tame (own by Sami people) and will not run away so you can photograph them quite easily while hiking on Kvaloya.

      Senja

      There is something called “Norwegian Scenic Routes” all around Norway, and one of these scenic routes is on Senja. There are actually 18 of these Scenic Routes in Norway.

      You can read more about the Senja scenic route and its attractions HERE.

      As for Senja, the most popular hikes/ mountains are:
      – Segla
      – Husfjell
      – Hesten

      Here is a list of some nice hiking routes on Senja (along the Scenic Route of Senja)

      Other places on Senja Island with beautiful views, wildlife, and nature are:

      Tungeneset
      Bergsbotn – A cool walking bridge with awesome views of the fjords and mountains! A real must-visit!
      Ersfjord – A stunning white-sanded beach
      – Hekkingen Fyr/ Lighthouse – An old lighthouse from 1859 located in an area with lots of eagles and other sea birds
      Husøy – A cozy fishing village

      The Lyngen Alps

      Another awesome area for you to explore (since you are a nature and wildlife photographer) is the Lyngen Alps area, located a couple of hours by car north of Tromso. It is a very arctic landscape with steep tall mountains that goes straight down into the fjords. It is very photogenic and a great area to go hiking in.

      In Lyngen, the Aspevannet or Blue Lake is spectacular and well worth the hike. You can read more about the Blue Lake here (sorry it is only in Norwegian).

      Reisa National Park

      Just north of the Lyngen Alps is the spectacular Reisa National Park with awesome nature and wildlife.

      To get to Reisa National Park from Tromso, you can either drive north through the Lyngen Alps (to Lyngseidet), and take the ferry across to Olderdalen. Then drive north from Olderdalen to Storslett.

      In Storlett, turn off the E6 highway and drive 44 km on route 856 to Bilto (Reisa Valley). Then continue a further 4km to Saraelv, where the road ends. You can see the driving route from Tromso to Reisa National Park here (Google Maps).

      If you drive to the end of the road, you will reach Ovi Raishiin, which serves at the gateway to the Reisa National Park. This is a wonderful place to visit and an excellent starting point for hikes into the national park. At Ovi Raishiin (Visitor Point), you will find information about the Reisa Valley and the national park, several fireplaces, and cabins.

      Here you can have a great view of the Reisa national park from the viewpoint. During the summer season, Ovi Raishiin is manned two days a week by a national park host. There is basic, unattended accommodation at Ovi Raaishiin. The Nordkalottstua cabin sleeps four and is available year-round. Visit the Halti building in Storslett to make a booking and pick up the key. Staying in this cabin costs NOK 175 per person per night.

      Another option is to enter the Reisa national park by riverboat from Bilto or Saraelv, which may be booked in the summertime.

      Read more about Reisa National Park HERE

      Hiking In Reisa National Park

      The are many hiking options in Reisa National Park. One is to the stunning waterfall Mollisfossen. From Saraelv this hike takes about 4 hours (20 km), you follow the trail on the south side of the river Reisaelva.

      One of the most popular hikes is to follow the Arctic Trail (Nordkalottleden). This is a marked trail that follows the western side of the Reisa River right up to the waterfall Nedrefoss. Here you walk across the river via a swing bridge up the eastern side of the river to Imo. From Imo, you walk up onto the mountain plateau all the way to Ráisjávri. An amazing view!

      If you would prefer a shorter hike, you can start at the visitors’ center at Ovi Raishiin and follow the trail on the western side of the river for roughly 9 km to Sieimma. When you reach Sieimma, you can admire the Stone Age Rock Art, which has been accessible to the public since 2013.

      Visitors to Reisa National Park may stay overnight in several unmanned cabins and turf huts:
      The Norwegian Trekking Association has two unmanned cabins in the area. One is at Nedrefoss and the other is at Ovi Rashiin.
      Statskog has a cabin at Ráisjávri.

      Cabins open for free use include Sieimmahytta (8 km from Saraelv), Vuomadathytta (22 km from Saraelv), Naustneset hytte (26 km from Saraelv), Imogammen (33 km from Saraelv), and Arthurgammen at Luvddidjohka (36 km from Saraelv).

      You will see lots of reindeer and eagles in Reisa National Park, and probably also some moose.

      Have a fantastic trip to Tromso! Looking forward to seeing your nature and wildlife photos on your webpage and social media. 🙂

      -Maria-

      Reply
      • Wow Maria, Thank you so much for the details you have provided. I must say that I’m a bit concerned with the long hikes due to the fact that I am carrying heavy photo equipment plus I’m not young anymore – I’m wondering if there was just one great hike (around 6k round trip) that would tick off the great vista photo there? We are just past the tent/cabin stage so probably would want to head back to a B&B or hotel after the hike. I’m curious about how many hours of sunlight I can expect at the different months from May to Sept. Need good lighting for my photography 🙂 Do you know of a site for seeing Puffins? Thanks Maria

        Reply
        • Hi again Lawrence,

          You’re welcome! Glad to hear that you found my information useful! 🙂

          Then I think it is best to go on several shorter hikes, maybe two or three mountains/ hikes per day, and then head back to your hotel/ B&B to sleep.

          Hours Of Sun In Tromso From May To September

          You can see the actual midnight sun (the sun never sets) from the 21st of May to the 21st of July. So during these eight weeks or so, you can photograph all day and night with good lighting. 🙂

          As for the rest of the spring, summer, and autumn, here are the times of sunrise and sunset in Tromso:

          1. May: Sunrise 03:18, Sunset 22:08 = Daylenght 18 h 50 min
          17. May: Sunrise 01:09, Sunset 00:10 = Daylength 22 h 44 min
          18. May – 25. July: The sun is up all-day
          26. July: Sunrise 01:19, Sunset 00:23 = Daylength 22 h 47 min
          1. August: Sunrise 02:24, Sunset 23:09 = Daylengt 20 h 45 min
          1. September: Sunrise 05:02, Sunset 20:22 = Daylength 15 h 19 min
          1. October: Sunrise 07:00, Sunset 18:04 = Daylength 11 h 04 min

          So you will have plenty of daylight during summer to photograph.

          The best places to see puffins are in one of the many bird cliffs, and the biggest and most famous are located in Lofoten and on Bleik/ Andenes. You can do puffin safari in Bleik/ Andenes.

          It takes about 7-8 hours to drive from Tromso to Andenes. You can also take the ferry from Senja, in a place called Gryllefjord, to Andenes. You can, for instance, drive from Tromso to Brensholmen (on Kvaloya) and take the ferry from Brensholmen to Senja. Once you have arrived on Senja with the ferry (a place called Botnhamn), you drive from Botnhamn to Gryllefjord. Then you take the ferry from Gryllefjord to Andenes. I have done this driving + the two ferry trips several times, and it is a stunning trip!

          -Maria-

          Reply
  72. Hey Maria,

    Wonderful Blog with loads of useful information. I must say one of the best blogs about hiking in Norway. We are arriving tromso tomorrow on 08.02.2020 and I have moderate experience with winter hiking but my friends (3 of them) are new to it. We hiked in Bergen 350 M 3 hours (to and fro) on 05.02 On a sunny day.
    What hike would you suggest us for 08.02 and 09.02. we would hike without a guide. We do have a rental car to get around tromso, and we are staying close to the airport.
    Awaiting reply,
    Thanks and regards from Trondheim Airport.

    Abhay

    Reply
    • Hi Abhay,

      Thank you so much! Awesome that you are here in Tromso right now!! Yay!

      Well, it is an unusually huge amount of snow here in Tromso right now. It started raining yesterday and it is raining and mild temperatures today as well, so the snow has melted a little. But if you don’t plan on renting skis, snowboards, or snowshoes, you should head to one of the mountains out towards the sea with less snow as it will be easier to hike.

      I suggest one of these hikes:

      Fløya (cable car)
      Located close to the city, only a 5 min drive from downtown. Easy hike with great views of the city. You can opt for the cable car on your way down if you are wet and exhausted. Also, you can enjoy the cozy restaurant/ cafe at the top of Fløya – have a cup of coffee, tea, or hot chocolate, or a beer, and something to eat. 🙂

      Ørnfløya
      Located out towards the sea, so not that much snow. Great views of the small island Sommarøy and the big island Senja. You can also head to the Sommarøy Hotel after the hike and have something to eat and drink. A very nice hotel with a cozy cafe/ restaurant! Sommarøy is a small fishing community, so it’s nice to walk around the small island as well, several beautiful beaches.

      Brosmetinden
      Also out towards the sea so not that much snow. It is a bit of a drive out there, however, over an hour drive each way so that can be a hassle on the slippy icy roads we have in Tromso at the moment. Also, there is not that much to do or see out there except for hiking the Brosmetinden (no hotels, shops, or cafes). So in that way, it is better to drive out to Ørnfløya and Sommarøy, more to see and do besides the hike.

      If you do drive out to Brosmetinden, make a stop at Grøtfjord, a beautiful fjord with a stunning beach.

      On your way to Ørnfløya or Brosmetind, you can stop at the cozy cafe Bryggejentene in Ersfjord. Nice view of the beautiful Ersfjord and a fantastic cafe with excellent coffee and bakeries. The cafe closes at 17:00 today (Saturday) and is closed tomorrow (Sunday).

      The mountain Nattmålsfjellet could also be a hiking option for you. It is a shorter drive, if you don’t want to spend hours in the car. Although I’m afraid that it might be much snow there right now. You can hike Nattmålsfjellet from the Ersfjord side as well if you want to combine it with a visit to the cafe Bryggejentene. Or you can hike Nattmålsfjellet from the other side that I have marked in this article, which is an easier hike and not that steep. It depends on your fitness level. 🙂

      Have a great time in Tromso and enjoy your hiking trips!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  73. Hi Maria – amazing service you are doing, thanks! We are coming in on a cruise in mid-June. We (me and my partner) would like to go hiking somewhere not too far from the port and yet away from the masses of tourists. So I have a two part question:
    – where do you suggest?
    – how do you suggest we get too & from the trailhead? Natural, I have to be super conservative on planning our return to the ship before it departs.

    Reply
    • Hi James,

      Thank you so much!

      You don’t say how many hours you have in Tromso, but I assume we are talking about only a few hours and not a full day?

      Then your best option is to hike the mountain Floya as it is very close to the city and you will get excellent views of the city, fjords, and mountains that surrounds the city.

      You can choose between two hiking paths to Floya – one to the left of the cable car (a stone staircase made by sherpas from Nepal) and one to the right of the cable car. Just follow the signs. The one to the right is longer but not as steep as the one to the left. The one to the right is also less crowded than the staircase which is very popular among the locals.

      It will probably be some people there so don’t expect to be hiking Floya all alone. But once you get up to the top, you can walk further towards the mountain Tromsdalstinden (you can, of course, stop any time and return back to the cable car). There are hardly any people in this part of the Floya mountain. So you can easily escape the crowds once you are at the top, as most people just flock around the cafe and observation platform at the top of the cable car.

      I also think that Floya is a good option for you since you can take the cable car down if you are short on time. If you, for instance, use more time hiking up than anticipated, you can take the cable car down and save some time instead of walking down. It will also save your knees. 🙂

      You can easily get to the start of the hiking trail to Floya by foot, bus, or taxi. Your cruise boat will probably anchor in Breivika Harbour. It is a bit far to walk from Breivika to the start of the Floya hiking trail (about 1 hour one way). By taxi, the drive only takes 10 min. You can also take the bus. From Breivika, you can take bus no. 42 into downtown. In downtown, you have to change the bus to bus no. 26 or 28.

      Enjoy your cruise in Norway and have a great hiking trip to Floya!

      -Maria-

      Reply
  74. Oh wow, thank you for this post. We are coming to Tromso next week and I was wondering what to do in this small, cold and boring city 😉 These hikes and all the information are pure gold, now all I need is good weather. If you can arrange it, I would appreciate it a lot 🙂 Keep on with the awesome work!

    Reply
  75. Honestly, its hard to pick just one of these hikes as my favorite. They’re all extremely beautiful! My husband and I are big winter hikers. Last year we hiked Plitvice Lakes National Park during the winter, and it was gorgeous. Something about snow covered hiking trails is peaceful, so we’d love to hike Rødtind during the winter time, and then go skiing as you mentioned. Are you able to rent ski gear here as well?

    Reply
    • Hi,

      Wow, hiking Plitvice Lakes National Park sounds amazing! I have unfortunately never been to Croatia yet, would love to someday. Croatian nature looks so beautiful. It is definitely on my travel list.

      Yes, you can rent everything you need to go hiking in Tromso at Tromso Outdoor – skis, shoes, snowboards, snowshoes, poles, and even clothes. You can either pick up and deliver your rented gear at their shop in downtown Tromso, or have the skis, gear, and clothes delivered to your hotel. Easy peasy! 🙂

      Hope to see you here in Tromso when the Norwegian borders open up again and the pandemic is over.

      Thank you so much for commenting!

      Take care and stay safe,
      Maria

      Reply

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